Megan Thee Stallion Reacts To Claim She Stole Fashion Nova Clothing Line Designs

(AllHipHop News) 

Megan Thee Stallion is defending her Fashion Nova collection from claims she stole the designs.

A designer named Aazhia accused the “Savage” star of nabbing inspiration for her Chase the Bag Shoulder Pad Mini Dress from the a TLZ L’Femme dress she created via Instagram last week.

“IMA BREAK THIS DOWN REAL SIMPLE! MY DRESS WAS STOLEN AND USED IN THIS MEGAN X FN COLLAB! WAS I TOLD? NO! WAS I COMPENSATED? NO!” she wrote, alleging a stylist reached out to Aazhia to pull one of her dresses for an event Megan was attending.


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A post shared by @aazhia

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“I’M VERY MUCH SO TAKEN BACK BY THE THE LACK OF RESPECT FOR ANOTHER BLACK WOMAN! THERE IS THIS TIRED NARRATIVE THAT THE BLAVK WOMAN IS SO DISRESPECTED, BUT WE DO IT TO EACH OTHER!!!!”

Megan has now responded during an interview with The Morning Hustle Podcast, stating, “A lot of times, people say that they talked to somebody from my team. I don’t know what year that was, I don’t know who… what are you talking about? And a lot of times, they won’t even bring me… they don’t tell me who they talking to.

“I feel bad that people’s initial reaction would be to just come at me like, ‘Oh, you a black woman! You’re stealing from black women!’ And I’m like, ‘Damn, hold on, sis, ’cause, like, I don’t know you’.”

Denying the allegations, Megan added, “If it would’ve been a real misunderstanding, I would’ve never had a problem saying, ‘I’m sorry, sis’. I would have checked my stylist. Like, you don’t do that. That’s not right. And then I would’ve had the dress taken down, whatever the money made from the dress, I would’ve gave the money to the girl if that was really something that she felt like was stolen from her.”

Aazhia has responded, adding, “I’m vexed because it’s condescending, it’s disrespectful, it’s hypocritical. Everything that she said was addressed towards me… My dress is from the ’90s. And she also said, in her opinion, it’s not stolen… But for me, all I saw was more disrespect.”

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Torrington resident’s business cooks up colorful hand-dyed designs with retro style

TORRINGTON — Margaret Gumbs was considering what to do with her time when she retired — some day.

Already a quilter and having studied interior design, she took the advice of her husband, Rodney, and turned a hobby into a new line of at-home work.

The Torrington resident, who works as a nurse, placed what she calls Maggie McFly Designs, on the website Etsy. She offers hand-dyed cotton yarn, hand-dyed cotton fabric, organic cotton “onesies” for infants, hand-dyed table décor, and ice-dyed clothing. She plans to broaden the scope of her offerings even more as her business gains traction.

“I began just by making a tie dye shirt for my husband, and also made one for my son. They loved them and encouraged me to continue and offer them for sale,” said Gumbs, who spends four days a week immersed in her new cottage industry.

Meanwhile, her husband, Rodney Gumbs calls himself the CEO of shipping, handling and delivery of the items to customers via mail or other means.


Gumbs creates what is known as tie-dye fabric and clothing, wildly colorful patterns on cotton that became all the rage back in the 1960s and 1970s when flower power, and love and peace signs permeated society. The unique clothing designs faded with subsequent generations but never really went away. Tie dye has has become popular again in recent years among young people and some elders, who want to relive their days of rebellion and counter-culture living, at least in the way they dress.

In “ice tie-dying,” the T-shirt, or whatever fabric one is using, is completely wet, then wrung out. The material being dyed is scrunched up and placed on a rack over the top of another container or dish. The more “scrunching”, the more chances of white peeking through. Said Gumbs, “The dye comes in a very fine powder form. When you apply it you need to wear a respirator mask so you don’t breathe it in.”

The container holding the item being dyed must be large enough to contain liquids from the shirt. Gumbs then generously covers the fabric with ice. Crushed ice insures coverage of all of the edges without the risk of larger ice cubes sliding off right away. This step could be substituted with snow. The ice covered items must be left alone for six to eight hours or longer. The longer it sits, the more intense the colors get. The items must be rinsed until the water runs clear. Then, the item is allowed to dry.

The process of traditional tie-dye typically consists of folding, twisting, pleating, or crumpling fabric or a garment and binding with string or rubber bands, followed by application of dye(s). The manipulations of the fabric prior to the application of dye are called resists, as they partially or completely prevent the applied dye from coloring the fabric.

The ice tie-dye designs that Gumbs creates are free-flowing and almost replicate the works of avant-garde painters. The colors are vibrant with no

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Megan Thee Stallion Denies Stealing Designs for Fashion Nova Collection

“A lot of times, people say that they talked to somebody from my team. I don’t know what year that was, I don’t know who… what are you talking about? And a lot of times, they won’t even bring me… they don’t tell me who they talking to,” Meg said in the interview. “If I’ve probably never heard of you, like I’ve never seen that dress before. But it’s been a dress that has been done a lot, like over the years. So I feel bad that people’s initial reaction would be to just come at me like, ‘Oh, you a Black woman! You’re stealing from Black women!’ And I’m like, ‘Damn, hold on, sis, ’cause like I don’t know you.'”

While denying the allegations, Megan explained how she would’ve made amends with the designer, whom she left unnamed during the interview.

“It’s a way to come at people. ‘Cause if it would’ve been a real misunderstanding, I would’ve never had a problem saying, ‘I’m sorry, sis.’ I would have checked my stylist. Like you don’t do that. That’s not right,” Megan continued. “And then I would’ve had the dress taken down, whatever the money made from the dress, I would’ve gave the money to the girl if that was really something that she felt like was stolen from her.”

The “Body” rapper’s Fashion Nova collection dropped exactly one week ago, with 106 denim pieces, dresses, bodysuits, outerwear and more ranging from $24.99 to $199.99. It reportedly brought in $1.2 million within the first 24 hours, according to TMZ, who broke the news last Friday — the same day Meg’s highly anticipated debut album Good News dropped.

Aazhia responded to Megan’s interview the same day in an IGTV video. “I’m vexed because it’s condescending, it’s disrespectful, it’s hypocritical. Everything that she said was addressed towards me, although we were talking about multiple Insta boutiques,” she claimed. “My dress is from the ’90s. And she also said, in her opinion, it’s not stolen…. But for me, all I saw was more disrespect.”

Watch Megan’s interview in full below.

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A Pinwheel Pie as Appealing as Her Fashion Designs

When Laura Kim was a child, her mother used all kinds of tricks to get her to eat. “She made it a sort of theater,” says the formerly finicky Kim, who, along with Fernando Garcia, is co-creative director of both Oscar de la Renta and Monse (the label she and Garcia launched in 2015). In a nod to Kim’s childhood nickname, Tokki, which is Korean for “bunny,” rabbit-shaped egg dishes often turned up on her plate and, she says, “My lunchboxes would always have fruit and vegetables cut up like animals inside.” Clearly, Kim’s mother already knew that her daughter was a visual person. Somewhere along the way, Kim also became a food person and, by the age of 9, was honing her skills at making duk gook, a Korean rice cake soup.

It’s something that Kim, 38, has kept up and even incorporated into her life as a designer, much to the delight of Garcia — who often comes over to Kim’s TriBeCa apartment for breakfasts of soufflé pancakes — and of the rest of her teams. Kim’s mother still likes to look after her daughter whenever possible, though: Monse’s aesthetic is less formal than that of Oscar, best known for its vibrant taffeta dresses, but during Fashion Week its showroom is likely to offer confections of another kind — tiny tea cakes, matcha truffles, petit fours and gluten-free cookies and bars, all homemade by the elder Ms. Kim, who would often fly down from her home in Calgary, Alberta, during the spring and fall shows.

Since the onset of the pandemic and social distancing measures, travel hasn’t been advisable, but Laura has turned her small home kitchen into a culinary atelier of sorts. Her sister, Jeang Kim, an interior designer who also lives in the city, helped her source a four-foot-long vintage wood-topped cutting table that extends her counter space. Since March, tarts topped with zucchini flowers, ombré apple pies and savory pastries sculpted in the shape of leaves — unsurprisingly, Kim is drawn to dishes that require artistry and handiwork — have all appeared on her Instagram feed. A terrace with a small cafe table, along with plumes of flowers and herbs, meanwhile, provides an intimate outdoor setting for Kim and the occasional guest. “For me, it’s not about feeding a lot of people so much as it’s about making something,” says Kim.

One of her favorite things to make — and a dish worth carting elsewhere so it can be shared with a larger group, when that again becomes safe — is her pinwheel pie, a savory medley of thinly sliced carrots, zucchini, eggplant and summer squash that rests atop a base of seasoned ricotta. Kim adapted it from a rice-based version her mother often baked so as to make vegetables more appealing to her daughter; additionally, chromatic and nutritional balance are pillars of Korean cooking: “You need five different colors on the table — and something from the ocean, something from the mountain and something

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