Sophie Shirley reaches milestone faster than almost everyone in Badgers women’s hockey history | Wisconsin Badgers Hockey



Sophie Shirley photo

Sophie Shirley scored twice in the Badgers’ 5-0 victory at Ohio State last Saturday, giving her 51 goals in 79 collegiate games.




Sophie Shirley, upon looking back on her first two seasons with the University of Wisconsin women’s hockey team, was quick to credit two teammates for helping her mature into a big-time player.



sophie shirley mug 12-4

S. Shirley


They’re two of the better players the Badgers have had in the last handful of seasons. Emily Clark was Shirley’s guide from their shared hometown of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Abby Roque was a linemate and inspiration on how to get things done.

“From my freshman year, I’ve had a lot of great role models,” Shirley said.

Last week, it was Shirley’s name that went alongside some legends of the Badgers program.

She became the 18th player to score at least 50 goals with the Badgers and did so in the fourth-fewest number of games. Only rookie goals record-holder Meghan Hunter (50 games) and the top two scorers in program history, Hilary Knight (66) and Brianna Decker (69), did it faster than Shirley’s 79 games.



Badgers women's hockey 50-goal scorers

Shirley’s linemate, Daryl Watts, reached 50 collegiate goals in 61 games at Boston College before she transferred to the Badgers before last season.

Together with center Brette Pettet, they form one of the most dangerous lines in college women’s hockey.

“When she has the puck, she’s one of those players like Watts that brings you to the edge of your seat,” Badgers coach Mark Johnson said about Shirley. “Like, what’s going to happen when she has the puck right now? Because it might be one of those highlight-reel shifts or plays that she’s able to put together.”

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Congress takes crucial step toward establishing Latino and women’s history museums

After years of commissions, reports and hearings, two proposed museums dedicated to American Latino and women’s history moved a step closer to reality Thursday, when a key Senate committee voted unanimously to approve them.

“This is a big day,” said Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), a member of the Senate Rules Committee and a co-sponsor of the bills that authorize the Smithsonian Institution to create the National Museum of the American Latino and the American Women’s History Museum.

Klobuchar predicted that she and her committee colleagues would remember the vote when the museums open.

“These museums are critical to expanding our understanding of Latino and women’s history,” she said.

Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.), whose advocacy for a Latino museum dates to 2003, when he was a House member, said the committee’s unanimous support of the previously passed House bill puts a Latino museum within reach.

“This is an extraordinary day in the long march toward the realization of the American Latino museum as part of our national fabric, as part of the long history of this country, a history that preceded this country,” Menendez said Thursday.

With dozens of bipartisan co-sponsors, the bills could be taken up soon by the full Senate. The House version of the bill establishing the women’s history museum was approved in February; the American Latino Museum Act was passed in July.

“I will be looking at every possible way to make that happen,” Menendez said.

[Buoyed by opening of African American Museum, backers try again for an America Latino museum]

The proposed museums would be the first new Smithsonians since the National Museum of African American History and Culture opened in 2016. Like that museum, the new museums would be financed with 50 percent federal funding and 50 percent private donations. The bills charge the Smithsonian’s Board of Regents with identifying the sites for the museums within two years.

Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie G. Bunch III offered his support for the museums.

“We are watching this important step in the process closely and will follow the guidance of Congress,” Bunch said in a statement Thursday that echoed his comments at the committee’s Nov. 17 hearing on the proposed museums. “Creating new museums is challenging, but, with appropriate funding, the Smithsonian has the skill and expertise to do it right. We can, and have, created museums that meet the needs of the nation and showcase the U.S. to the world.”

If approved, the legislation would allow the museums to collect artifacts related to their missions, create exhibitions and programs, including educational efforts, and collaborate with other Smithsonian facilities. Both bills also include language “ensuring diversity of political viewpoints.”

[Congressional panel calls for Smithsonian museum of women’s history]

Advocates have been pushing for an American Latino museum since 1994, when the Smithsonian released a report, “Willful Neglect,” outlining its failures to promote the history and culture of Hispanic Americans. The report, which called for a stand-alone museum, led to the creation of the Smithsonian Latino Center in 1997.

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Latino, women’s history Smithsonian museums get Senate committee approval

Klobuchar predicted that she and her committee colleagues would remember the vote when the museums open.

“These museums are critical to expanding our understanding of Latino and women’s history,” she said.

Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.), whose advocacy for a Latino museum dates to 2003, when he was a House member, said the committee’s unanimous support of the previously passed House bill puts a Latino museum within reach.

“This is an extraordinary day in the long march toward the realization of the American Latino museum as part of our national fabric, as part of the long history of this country, a history that preceded this country,” Menendez said Thursday.

“I will be looking at every possible way to make that happen,” Menendez said.

The proposed museums would be the first new Smithsonians since the National Museum of African American History and Culture opened in 2016. Like that museum, the new museums would be financed with 50 percent federal funding and 50 percent private donations. The bills charge the Smithsonian’s Board of Regents with identifying the sites for the museums within two years.

Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie G. Bunch III offered his support for the museums.

“We are watching this important step in the process closely and will follow the guidance of Congress,” Bunch said in a statement Thursday that echoed his comments at the committee’s Nov. 17 hearing on the proposed museums. “Creating new museums is challenging, but, with appropriate funding, the Smithsonian has the skill and expertise to do it right. We can, and have, created museums that meet the needs of the nation and showcase the U.S. to the world.”

If approved, the legislation would allow the museums to collect artifacts related to their missions, create exhibitions and programs, including educational efforts, and collaborate with other Smithsonian facilities. Both bills also include language “ensuring diversity of political viewpoints.”

Advocates have been pushing for an American Latino museum since 1994, when the Smithsonian released a report, “Willful Neglect,” outlining its failures to promote the history and culture of Hispanic Americans. The report, which called for a stand-alone museum, led to the creation of the Smithsonian Latino Center in 1997.

In 2003, Congress established a commission to study the creation of a museum, a step that launched the earlier African American and American Indian museums. Legislators have introduced bills establishing a Latino museum in every Congress since 2011. Thursday’s vote was the first major Senate action in a decade.

“These two museums would provide a place where visitors can see, learn and gain a greater appreciation for the role that women and Latinos have played in shaping the nation we are today,” Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.), the committee chairman, said before the vote.

In 2014, Congress created a bipartisan commission to study a women’s history museum. That panel released a report in 2016, prompting Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney (D-N.Y.) to introduce her first bill based on the commission’s findings.

Maloney said she is optimistic that the Senate will finish the job.

“I

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HomeFront: The year’s best TV, fashion history, remembering John Lennon

TV: The setup of “Your Honor” is promising — Bryan Cranston plays a New Orleans judge whose teenage son is the driver in a fatal hit-and-run — but “much of what comes after the forceful opening is a disappointment,” says Gilbert. Four episodes in, Cranston’s character “just keeps screwing up,” and “[t]he thought of six more episodes watching more things run amok isn’t an especially happy one.”

A less suspenseful story than “The Crown” is hard to imagine, but with season 4, the series has turned a corner. Princess Diana (and Margaret Thatcher) are on the scene, and “[v]iewers who previously might have dismissed creator Peter Morgan’s drama as a stuffy spectacle . . . are suddenly enthralled,” Gilbert writes. “During this season’s 1979-1990 timeline, the family turns into a pack of wolves preying on a defenseless lamb.”

TV TALK: Globe TV critic Matthew Gilbert hosts a subscriber-only event, “The Crown and More,” Friday from 1 to 2 p.m. He’ll discuss the best of television available for streaming, including his just-released top 10 picks for 2020. You’ll hear what his job is like and have the opportunity to ask questions about your favorite shows, what to watch next, and all things TV. RSVP here.

FILM: “Another Round” is a “stinging, gorgeously filmed tragicomedy about male insecurity and the power of positive drinking,” Globe film critic Ty Burr writes in a 3½-star review. Director and co-writer Thomas Vinterberg’s tale of middle-aged men experimenting with “a program of steady, judicious daily drinking” offers a look at Danish life before it “widens its scope to the international stage and the totality of the human condition.”

Before you roll your eyes at the news that Francis Ford Coppola has re-edited “The Godfather: Part III” into “The Godfather Coda: The Death of Michael Corleone,” check with Burr. The 30-year-overdue reimagining “is largely and surprisingly successful, a judiciously trimmed and re-sorted rethinking of how Al Pacino’s Michael Corleone tries to get out of the crime business and how it ‘pulls him back in’ again.”

The “darkly magnetic” Aubrey Plaza tackles “an ambiguous but emotionally sprawling dramatic role” in “Black Bear,” which earns 2½ stars from Burr. The film “turns in on itself, prompting audiences to wonder whose story is being told and in what order.” Short answer: Plaza as a screenwriter (or is she?) in need of a break, and Christopher Abbott and Sarah Gadon as a maybe-couple in “a high-tension examination of artistic and domestic betrayal.”

With Elliot Page in the headlines, the timing of two documentaries that explore the trans life experience is serendipitous. Matt Kliegman’s “Markie in Milwaukee” is biographical, “and it impresses with its artfulness and insight as it captures the tormented soul of its subject,” writes Globe correspondent Peter Keough. Tania Cypriano’s “Born to Be” follows plastic surgeon Dr. Jess Ting and five patients, creating an “intimately observational and moving” story.

Titling a movie “Love, Weddings & Other Disasters” is asking for trouble, and sure enough, Burr gives the “dreary, low-rent

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Peabody Essex follows a feminist thread through fashion history

That’s right: Until four years ago, a woman had never led one of the most iconic women’s fashion brands in its 70-year history. Ever. Chiuri’s blunt corrective paraded down the runway at the Musée Rodin for Paris Fashion Week Fall 2016, and it serves as a fitting opening salvo for “Made It!” It’s a show determined to transcend aesthetic ingenuity to grapple with the social history inherent in every stitch of women’s wear, spanning centuries.

More than that, “Made It!” is about taking power to share power, bit by bit — a quiet revolution against the arbitrary strictures of gender, cloaked in lace and lamé and chiffon. “Made It!” is a joint effort between the Peabody Essex Museum and the Kunstmuseum den Haag in the Netherlands, but it’s dressed up in American garb. That’s owing both to PEM’s own extensive fashion and textile collection, well-represented here, as well as the show’s timing. Even delayed many months by the pandemic, the late-November opening meant that PEM curator Petra Slinkard could still dedicate the exhibition to the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage, just as she planned. That she was able to open the show the very same month that women played a critical role in bringing about change in the White House — suburban women, we salute you — feels significant, indeed.

Not that those seeking opulent ingenuity won’t find it. There are plenty of Chanels and Lanvins, Kawakubos and McQueens. But the point of “Made It!” isn’t to celebrate uncomplicated beauty so much as it is to pay homage to the revolutionary beauty that overcame mountains of complications — social, political, economic — to thrive and empower women from one generation to the next.

The first gallery celebrates European tailoring guilds from the late 1600s.
The first gallery celebrates European tailoring guilds from the late 1600s.Kathy Tarantola/Courtesy Peabody Essex Museum

In the exhibition’s accompanying book, Slinkard makes a case for the historical entwinement of fashion with social and economic power. The opening paragraphs of her essay “At the Cutting Edge: American Fashion as Catalyst for Change” dives right into the 1824 strike of 102 women at a Pawtucket, R.I., textile factory, the first major factory strike in American history. It’s an emblematic tale about agency and opportunity taken, not given. Almost a century before they could vote, women became an organized labor force in an industry where they dominated, providing a model for generations to come.

Staking their claim in the economy also gave women blossoming power over their own appearance, which, traditionally, had been determined by how men liked to see them (one word: corsets). Mass production dominated by women led to some significant shifts in comfort, among other things. In the mid-19th century, as the ranks of women garment workers ballooned by the tens of thousands, the rational dress movement — a name you have to love — moved from tightly-wound torso binding toward loose and comfy garments like bloomers.

“Made It!” takes this foundational tale and runs with it, backward and forward. The first gallery, called “Breaking In,”

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Vanderbilt’s Sarah Fuller Set Out To Be A Role Model And Made History In The Process

There’s no question this is a landmark year—one that, for a myriad of reasons, will be viewed in the years to come as a major inflection point in our respective lifetimes. For instance, this upcoming college football Saturday will be must-see television when Vanderbilt University and the first-ever female player on a Power Five conference team take on the 11th ranked Georgia Bulldogs. Should you tune in to see Sarah Fuller lining up for kickoff, know that she won’t be making history—she did that last week.

I recognized what a monumental milestone it was when my 11-year-old daughter, Maddie, bounced around our living room with excitement about my favorite sport. Not once had she ever talked endlessly about a specific football game until this particular one being played in Columbia, Missouri, featuring a winless Vanderbilt team. The contest dominated every national headline because for the first time ever, a female student-athlete put on the helmet and shoulder pads to compete in the NCAA’s highest division and arguably the sport’s toughest conference. Sarah Fuller is now the name my daughter will never forget and for good reason—when she trotted onto the field as starting kicker for the second half of her team’s blowout loss to the Missouri Tigers, she executed a squib kick and shattered a ceiling. On Tuesday she was named SEC football co-player of the Week.

Each of us has at least one moment that changes our lives and inspires us to think beyond our wildest dreams. Each of us has a role model or a person significant enough to us that we stop whatever we’re doing, and observe what they do in marquee moments. In this instance, Fuller was not afraid to step up while everyone was watching. She embraced the moment and reveled in the opportunity it brought for her to be a role model. Fuller has handled the attention with great poise and composure. In every media appearance since this past Saturday’s game, she’s reinforced her intentions of being a role-model for little girls everywhere more so than being in the history books for all-time.

Just last month, Fuller’s prowess on the soccer pitch, as starting goalkeeper, helped Vanderbilt secure the Southeastern Conference Championship. And while the 21-year-old who stands 6’2’’ and has been seen kicking soccer balls from nearly goal post to goal post, was making plans to join her family for Thanksgiving, she answered a call to join a football team who was in dire need of

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Women’s Euro 2022: How unfancied Northern Ireland made history

Rachel Furness
Rachel Furness carried her impressive club form with Liverpool onto the international stage

“We want to make sure we work hard to get better by bringing a positive energy and all those things that make a good football team. We are at a stage now where the girls are ready to go and take it forward.”

They are the words of Kenny Shiels when he was appointed Northern Ireland boss in May 2019. Then, Northern Ireland were ranked 59th in the world and were firm outsiders to have a shot in Group C which contained favourites Norway and a strong Wales side.

However, 18 months on, Shiels’ unfancied, yet determined Northern Ireland created history which will change football for a generation in Northern Ireland.

Here’s how Northern Ireland went from underdogs and winless to breaking boundaries’ and showing anything is possible.

Northern Ireland 0-6 Norway

Northern Ireland 0-1 Norway

On paper, this looks like a bit of a hammering but it was a game that was crucial to Northern Ireland’s learning process under Shiels.

Up against the former world and European champions, Shiels’ early blueprint was clear to see. A switch from the defensive-minded approach of the past, Northern Ireland were playing out from the back and trying to keep possession at Seaview.

Ultimately, it was a baptism of fire against a world-class Norway outfit, who punished several mistakes at the back to turn on the style against the hosts.

In particular, Barcelona star Caroline Graham Hansen was in ruthless form and she bagged a hat-trick.

However, if you thought a heavy defeat would hinder the growing confidence and new-found approach of this Northern Ireland side then you would be very much mistaken.

Wales 2-2 Northern Ireland

Wales 2-2 NI

They may not have known it at the time, but a night in Newport would be decisive in Northern Ireland’s fortunes in Group C.

Wales, full of WSL players, came into the match on the back of a 6-0 win over the Faroe Islands, compared to the 6-0 defeat suffered by Shiels’ side.

Simone Magill headed Northern Ireland into an unlikely lead, however the hosts hit back against the run of play through Angharad James and Kayleigh Green.

It looked like the dream was over for Shiels’ young side, like many NI teams before them, against a side 27 places above them in the world rankings. However, Ashley Hutton hadn’t read that script. In fact, she tore it up completely.

With basically the last kick of the match and on her 100th international appearance, the Linfield defender levelled the game at the death and sparked unforgettable scenes of celebration.

Two away goals against Wales would turn out to be vital and, to use the Jurgen Klopp analogy, it was almost the moment Northern Ireland went from “doubters to believers”. They couldn’t possibly do it, could they?

Norway 6-0 Northern Ireland

Norway 6-0 NI

After the draw against Wales, the return fixture against Norway was never going to determine Northern Ireland’s fate.

Just like at Seaview, Northern Ireland were outclassed by

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Cyber Monday becomes biggest online shopping day in U.S. history, topping nearly $11 billion in sales

Cyber Monday just became the biggest online shopping day in U.S. history, with consumers spending $10.8 billion online, according to Adobe Analytics.

Purchases totaled $12 million a minute between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. PT, with around 37 percent of total purchases coming from smartphones as more shoppers migrate to buying on social media. Curbside pickup was up 30 percent since last year, Adobe said.

Consumers saw the biggest discounts on computers, sporting goods, toys, appliances, and electronics, Adobe said. Some of the hottest buys included Lego sets, Apple AirPods and Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War.

“Moving forward into December, the categories that I will expect to be discounted will be the toy category and then also anything holiday themed — gift baskets, gift boxes, decor,” retail and shopping expert Trae Bodge told NBC News.

Although many discounts are set to continue throughout December, experts advise to shop early as shipping delays loom and delivery costs are expected to increase after Dec. 11.

“Leading up into the first few weeks of December, up until Dec. 25 — that’s when the discounts are really going to get deeper,” said Sara Skirboll, shopping expert at RetailMeNot. “But here’s the thing, your items might not exist — and if you’re shopping online, you might run into shipping issues.”

Like the discounts, the record-breaking sales seen on Cyber Monday aren’t specific to one day.

Thanksgiving Day, Black Friday and Small Business Saturday also did well, totaling $5.1 billion, $9 billion and $4.7 billion respectively, according to Adobe.

Small businesses saw a greater increase in sales than larger retailers on Cyber Monday, up 501 percent while bigger retailers only saw a 486 percent increase, as consumers shop more consciously this year, Adobe said. Seven in 10 shoppers said it is more important to support small businesses than to get the best deal, according to a survey from Union Bank.

Consumers are also “voting with their wallets to support Black-owned businesses and sustainable businesses,” Harley Finkelstein, president of e-commerce platform Shopify, told NBC News’ Jo Ling Kent on Monday. “Consumers will not be driven solely by deals anymore, they’re going to be driven by movements.”

Shopify saw its biggest-ever Black Friday/Cyber Monday weekend, recording a 76 percent growth in sales since last year. Small-business hub Etsy saw an 84 percent increase in sales during the first eight hours of Cyber Monday alone, according to Edison Trends.

Online shopping has seen a continued surge since the beginning of the pandemic, with digital sales up by 174 percent at Best Buy, 155 percent at Target and 79 percent at Walmart during the third quarter alone.

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Cyber Monday was biggest online shopping day in U.S. history

Consumers pounced on discounts and deals this Cyber Monday, making it the single largest day for online sales in U.S. history. 

Shoppers spent a record $10.8 billion Monday, marking an all-time high for ecommerce spending and beating last year’s $9.4 billion record, according to Adobe Analytics. 

Fully one-quarter of the day’s sales — $2.7 billion — were made during the so-called “golden hours of retail,” between 7  p.m.and 11 p.m. Pacific Time. Consumers spent a whopping $12 million per minute on toys, electronics, clothing, appliances and more during the  8 p.m. to 9 p.m. peak hour of shopping mania, according to Adobe. 

Monday’s total spend represented a 15% year-over-year increase in sales. 

“Cyber Monday continued to dominate the holiday shopping season, becoming the biggest online shopping day in U.S. history, despite early discounts from retailers. Throughout the remainder of the holiday season, we expect to see record sales continue and curbside pickup to gain even more momentum as shoppers avoid crowds and potential shipping delays,” Taylor Schreiner, director of Adobe Digital Insights, said in a statement Tuesday.

Records shattered

Black Friday sales were strong too, with consumers spending $9 billion online the day after Thanksgiving, up nearly 22% from last year’s shopping extravaganza and marking the third-biggest day for ecommerce sales in U.S. history after Cyber Monday this year and in 2019.

Concerns over COVID-19, along with customer capacity limits at retailers, thinned crowds at stores and malls this year. But shoppers were still drawn to deals on Hot Wheels cars, which were among the top-selling items on Black Friday, according to Adobe Analytics. 

The Super Mario 3D All-Stars and Animal Crossing video games for the Nintendo Switch system were also in demand, as were Apple’s AirPods ear buds and the Apple Watch. The smartwatch category saw a big surge in sales, soaring more than 600% over the daily average in October. 

Adobe identified the spending trends by analyzing data generated by roughly 1 trillion visits to retail sites, as well as looking at 80 of the 100 largest retailers in the U.S. 

No place like home

Self-balancing electric scooters, also known as hoverboards, Lego sets, Amazon Echo products and Samsung TVs were also in high demand on Black Friday.

“Generally, the popular items this year trended toward home automation and other kinds of products that serve that stay-at-home consumer and make their lives easier as they spend more time at home,” Adobe Analytics vice president Keith Eadie said. 

“Video games are always popular. The gaming industry is having its best year ever,” Eadie added.

Small Business Saturday, which had particular importance this year amid the pandemic’s impact on independent stores, also seemed to resonate with consumers. Companies with $10 million to $50 million in annual revenue saw a nearly 300% increase in sales compared to a normal day, according to Adobe.


Small businesses struggle despite Black Frida…

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Kym Rodgers, owner of Brooklyn Sweet Spot, a Brooklyn, New York, bakery, said she doesn’t usually get much business

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Amazon says this year’s holiday shopping period has been the biggest in its history

  • Amazon has announced that this year’s holiday shopping season has been the biggest in its history.
  • More consumers are doing their holiday shopping from their couch this year, due to the pandemic.
  • Amazon is widely expected to be one of the biggest winners this holiday season, with one Wall Street firm estimating it could capture 42 cents of every dollar spent during the busy shopping period.



a person standing in front of a laptop: An Amazon fulfillment center in Frankenthal, Germany.


© Provided by CNBC
An Amazon fulfillment center in Frankenthal, Germany.

Amazon said Tuesday that this year’s holiday shopping season has been the biggest in its history, as the coronavirus pandemic forced more people than ever to do their shopping online.

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The e-commerce giant said in a blog post that customers have been shopping early for gifts and seasonal items for their loved ones. It comes as many retailers reliant on physical stores have been struggling to survive.

Popular purchases so far include the new Echo Dot, Barack Obama’s “A Promised Land” book, and the Revlon One-Step Hair Dryer and Volumizer Brush, Amazon said. Self-care, “nesting at home”, and “cozy comfort” were among the most popular trends during the period.

“In a holiday season unlike any other, it’s clear that customers still want great deals on gifts for their loved ones or a little something extra for themselves, and we’re glad to help deliver smiles throughout the season,” said Jeff Wilke, CEO of Amazon Worldwide Consumer, in a statement.

“Thank you to our customers, employees, and selling partners around the world for making this our biggest holiday season to date, and for everything you’re doing to support our communities and each other now and throughout the year.”

Video: How to save money when shopping online this holiday season (CNBC)

How to save money when shopping online this holiday season

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The company didn’t disclose actual sales figures for Black Friday or Cyber Monday, which are typically the company’s two busiest days in the holiday shopping period.

Amazon has been criticized for promoting its own products above those from independent retailers, but the company said the latter had seen “record demand” on its platform this year.

Independent businesses selling on Amazon surpassed $4.8 billion in worldwide sales from Black Friday through Cyber Monday, Amazon said, noting that the figure was up 60% on last year. It added that 71,000 small and medium-sized businesses had seen sales above $100,000 in this holiday season so far.

Like many other retailers, Amazon began offering holiday deals earlier than ever this year. Prime Day, which was pushed back from mid-July to October, became the unofficial kickoff to the holiday shopping season.

Consumers still opened up their wallets on Black Friday and Cyber Monday, despite the earlier start, and did more of their shopping online. Spending online on Black Friday this year climbed 22% year over year to a record $9 billion, according to Adobe Analytics. Cyber Monday, the busiest online shopping day of the year, is also expected to notch record sales.

The

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