Best Disney Jewelry Gifts | POPSUGAR Smart Living

“I can show you the world — shining, shimmering, splendid” — jewelry that is, inspired by the magic and allure of Disney. We all have at least one friend who figuratively lives in a magical kingdom far, far away or perhaps under the sea. Why not indulge their love for all things Disney with jewelry they can wear every day? From stunning studs that are shaped like Minnie’s ears to a necklace that symbolizes ohana means family, we curated 54 stunning pieces of jewelry that your loved ones will appreciate. Whether it is minimalist or a statement piece, inspired by the timeless princesses or the brave Jedi or badass Avengers, we have something for everyone at all price ranges. The holidays get a lot more magical with a little bit of Disney.

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Best BaubleBar Jewelry Sets For Every Type of Girlfriend

Back when I used to commute every day, I never felt fully dressed unless I had on my favorite pair of stud earrings. Even now that I still dress up to stay home, my looks aren’t complete unless I’m wearing some sort of jewelry. I feel so exposed without these accessories, I really only take them off at night.

The holidays are as good a time as any to get some new ornaments for your friends who, like me, feel vulnerable without their go-to bangle, gold chain, or stack of rings on. But since everyone has different tastes, you can cover your bases with not one but at least two styles with the gift of a BaubleBar set.

Ahead, I’ve curated some stylish new pieces they will love adding to their jewelry box.

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Pro-Biden effort offered Native Americans $25-$500 Visa gift cards and jewelry to vote

Key Native American leaders working with the Biden campaign offered tribal members and associates Visa gift cards, jewelry, and other “swag” to vote in the presidential election, according to several videos being used by the Trump campaign’s effort to challenge Nevada’s vote.

In one long video, officials from the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony are shown offering a raffle for gift cards in values of $25, $100, $250, and $500 to those who can prove they voted.

Other gifts for voting include bracelets, necklaces, earrings, T-shirts, and masks.

“If you come here to vote or if you voted already, RSIC is having a raffle,” said RSIC spokeswoman Bethany Sam in one of the videos.

She also said, there are “a lot of great things to push you guys to get out here to vote, challenge you go get you out here to vote.”

In the same video, she is shown wearing a Biden-Harris anti-virus mask and in front of the Biden-Harris campaign bus.

Screen Shot 2020-12-03 at 11.25.51 AM.png
Screen shot from one of the videos shows a spokeswoman for the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony offering gift cards to Native American voters.

The Trump campaign is expected to present the videos today in a Carson City court as it presses its case to challenge enough votes to overturn the state’s election of Joe Biden.

In a briefing paper on their case, the campaign referred to a “Native American Votes for Dollars Scandal.”

It said, “A shocking number of states have discovered that groups claiming to support the Native American community’s voice at the polls have engaged in blatantly illegal bribery and vote incentivizing with cash cards, gas cards, electronics and other items. This scandal appears to have been rampant in Nevada. Posts on the Nevada Native Vote Project Facebook page show that similar raffles were conducted in 15 Nevada native communities, with 116 voters receiving $6,650 in cash prizes.”

The RSIC did not respond to an email seeking comment.

But a lawyer for Native Americans dismissed the charges to Nevada’s NPR. “I think that this lawsuit is a little bit reckless,” Jacqueline De León, staff attorney for the Native American Rights Fund, told NPR. “It’s sort of just casting a wide net of disparagement on the Nevada Native Vote Project. And it turns out a lot of their claims are unsubstantiated.”

She added that the raffles were open to all, but the videos limited entry to Native Americans and their associates or staffers.

The Native American vote was credited for pushing Biden over the victory line in some states such as Nevada and Arizona.

Liberal CNN commentator Van Jones said on-air, “The Native American community played a tremendous role.” He added, “They are responsible for the victory.”

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Pro-Biden effort offered Native Americans $25-$500 Visa gift cards, jewelry to vote

Key Native American leaders working with the Biden campaign offered tribal members and associates Visa gift cards, jewelry and other “swag” to vote in the presidential election, according to several videos being used by the Trump campaign’s effort to challenge Nevada’s vote.



a person standing in front of a store: Lummi Tribal member Patsy Wilson, right, is assisted by Lummi Native Vote Team 2020 volunteer Kelli Jefferson in voting Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020, on the Lummi Reservation, near Bellingham, Wash.


© Elaine Thompson/AP
Lummi Tribal member Patsy Wilson, right, is assisted by Lummi Native Vote Team 2020 volunteer Kelli Jefferson in voting Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020, on the Lummi Reservation, near Bellingham, Wash.

In one long video, officials from the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony are shown offering a raffle for gift cards in values of $25, $100, $250 and $500 to those who can prove they voted.

Other gifts for voting include bracelets, necklaces, earrings, T-shirts and masks.

“If you come here to vote or if you voted already, RSIC is having a raffle,” said RSIC spokeswoman Bethany Sam in one of the videos.

She also said, there are “a lot of great things to push you guys to get out here to vote, challenge you go get you out here to vote.”

In the same video, she is shown wearing a Biden-Harris anti-virus mask and in front of the Biden-Harris campaign bus.



a person wearing a costume: Screen shot from one of the videos shows a spokeswoman for the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony offering gift cards to Native American voters.


© Provided by Washington Examiner
Screen shot from one of the videos shows a spokeswoman for the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony offering gift cards to Native American voters.

The Trump campaign is expected to present the videos today in a Carson City court as it presses its case to challenge enough votes to overturn the state’s election of Joe Biden.

In a briefing paper on their case, the campaign referred to a “Native American Votes for Dollars Scandal.”

It said, “A shocking number of states have discovered that groups claiming to support the Native American community’s voice at the polls have engaged in blatantly illegal bribery and vote incentivizing with cash cards, gas cards, electronics and other items. This scandal appears to have been rampant in Nevada. Posts on the Nevada Native Vote Project Facebook page show that similar raffles were conducted in 15 Nevada native communities, with 116 voters receiving $6,650 in cash prizes.”

The RSIC did not respond to an email seeking comment.

But a lawyer for Native Americans dismissed the charges to Nevada NPR. “I think that this lawsuit is a little bit reckless,” Jacqueline De León, staff attorney for the Native American Rights Fund, told NPR. “It’s sort of just casting a wide net of disparagement on the Nevada Native Vote Project. And it turns out a lot of their claims are unsubstantiated.”

She added that the raffles were open to all, but the videos limited entry to Native Americans and their associates or staffers.

The Native American vote was credited for pushing Biden over the victory line in some states such as Nevada and Arizona.

Liberal CNN commentator Van Jones said on air, “The Native American community played a tremendous role.” He added, “they are responsible for the victory.”

Tags: Washington Secrets, 2020 Election Videos, Campaign 2020, Joe Biden, Nevada, Native

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Study finds which Disney princess has the most expensive jewelry

When you wish upon a star, hopefully you’ll get jewels as lavish as these.

In a new study called “Kingdom of Jewels,” U.K.-based financial advisory company Money.co.uk worked in collaboration with David Allen of Purely Diamonds to conclude how much the jewelry of each Disney princess would cost in real-life cash. The study took a look at each piece owned by every princess starting with the 1937 film “Snow White and the Seven Dwarves.”

So, who has the most expensive bling of them all?

That honor goes to Queen Elsa from the 2013 hit film “Frozen,” whose scepter, tiara and orb were theorized to be made of gold and 20-carat sapphires in order to calculate the combined value. Based upon these estimations, the total cost of all three came out to $800,000.

Queen Elsa’s sister, Anna, comes in at second. Her tiara and necklace come out to a combined total of $230,000.

We’re sure both Elsa and Anna wouldn’t let those items go any time soon.

Other Disney princesses included on the list were Cinderella—whose earrings and glass slippers amounted to $55,000 altogether—as well as Ariel from “The Little Mermaid,” whose seashell bra and earrings were estimated to cost $750.

CInderella's jewels

Cinderella’s glass slippers and pearl earrings were estimated at a combined value of $55,000. (graphic courtesy of Money.co.uk)

Even Snow White’s red velvet headband was pricier than anything found at Urban Outfitters, coming to a total of $85.

Another princess added to the list actually took the crown over Elsa’s jewelry, although she’s technically not an original Disney princess (the rights to her film were purchased by the company in 2019). The tiara of Anastasia—the animated character based on the historical lost Romanov—was estimated to have a total value of over $5 million.

The rest of us, it would seem, are stuck with Kay Jewelers.

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25% off coupon, $10 Kohl’s Cash, 20% off jewelry coupon :: WRAL.com

* This post contains affiliate links and we may receive a small commission if you make a purchase.

Kohl’s has a new sale with multiple stackable offers including a 25% off coupon, 20% off jewelry coupon, 10% off watch coupon and $10 Kohl’s Cash for every $50 you spend at Kohls.com HERE!

You’ll save up to 80% off jewelry with the sales and both coupons! There are also sales up to 60% off on outerwear and cold weather accessories for kids & adults, Jumping Beans fleece clothing for kids and more!

See all the sales at Kohls.com HERE!

* 25% Off Coupon: Use the coupon code FAMILYSAVE through Dec. 9, 2020 to save 20% off your total order. The coupon is valid using any payment type.

* 20% Off Jewelry Coupon: Use the coupon code SPARKLE20 through Dec. 9, 2020 to save 20% off fine and silver jewelry. The coupon is valid using any payment type.

*10% Off Watches Coupon: Use the coupon code WATCHES10 through Dec. 9, 2020 to save 10% off watches. The coupon is valid using any payment type.

* Kohl’s Cash: Earn $10 Kohl’s Cash for every $50 you spend through Dec. 9! It is redeemable from Dec. 10-20, 2020.

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* There are great clothing deals for adults and kids up to 50% off plus save even more with the 25% off coupon! See all the clothing deals HERE.

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* Up to 70% off Clearance plus save an additional 25% off with the coupon!

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* Powerbeats High-performance Wireless Earphones: $129.99 (reg. $149.99). You can’t use coupons on this item but you can earn Kohl’s Cash. 

* Powerbeats Pro Totally Wireless Earphones: $199.99. You can’t use coupons on this item but you can earn Kohl’s Cash.

* SYou’ll also find great deals on other electronics including Garmin GPS watches, JBL headphones and bluetooth speakers, All-new Echo Dot and Echo Show, weather station and more at Kohls.com HERE!

Jewelry

Coupon Stack: Use coupon code FAMILYSAVE to save 25% off your total order and coupon code SPARKLE20 to save 20% off jewelry!

* Save up to 80% off diamond and gemstone earrings, rings, necklaces and bracelets at Kohls.com HERE with the stackable 25% off coupon and the 20% off jewelry coupons! There are some excellent buys using the coupons!

* Disney’s Minnie Mouse Birthstone Stud Earrings: $11.99 after both coupons (reg. $50)

* Silver and Boxed Silver Jewelry Gifts: $11.99 after both coupons (reg. $50)!

* Sterling Silver Lab-Created Blue & White Sapphire Adjustable Bracelet: $29.99 (reg. $125) after both coupons

* 1/4 Carat T.W. Diamond Composite Round

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Stressed? Fidget All You Like With This Jewelry

Jewelry that is meant to be played with might be the ideal accessory for an anxious age.

As the coronavirus pandemic began, Jess Hannah Révész — like much of the world — found herself housebound with a surfeit of frayed nerves that needed an outlet. The Los Angeles-based jeweler directed her energy into creating a capsule collection of three minimalist ring designs — Pivot I, II and III — for her brand J. Hannah, each a variation on the same theme: an outer ring that, when spun by the wearer, moves freely around a stationary inner band.

They were part of her effort to self-soothe as she found herself making more use of fidget tools to address what she called her “anxiety and O.C.D. tendencies,” and her own take on a spinning ring that she wore as a child for the same reasons. “I wanted to reinterpret it in my own design lens and make it something I would personally use and find practical but also beautiful and could potentially help others,” Ms. Révész said.

It turns out her creations are among a subset of jewels that are aesthetically appealing, but also a playground for jumpy fingers that need to twiddle and twirl.

Possession, one of the most popular collections by the Swiss heritage jeweler Piaget, marked its 30th anniversary this year. It, too, originated with a yellow gold spinner ring and then was extended to a host of jewels — watches with rotating bezels, open bangles with diamond finials, gemstone pendants — that featured similar movement. According to the brand, spinning the jewel brings luck and happiness to its owner.

Amy Simon Hopwood, associate curator of decorative arts at the Newark Museum of Art in New Jersey, said such spinning rings trace their lineage to objects with a spiritual purpose: Tibetan prayer wheels. “They have the same sense of ritual and counting off, like a prayer,” she said. “It’s kind of a mnemonic.”

Another apt comparison: prayer beads, religious objects that doubled as adornments. “Most cultures have some version of prayer beads,” Ms. Hopwood said. “The earliest examples come out of the Buddhist tradition and Hinduism and spread across the globe to most religions.”

Worry beads are the secular descendants of strands used for sacred observances and can be held and jostled as needed. The Greek jewelry brand Lalaounis reports a recent uptick in requests for them. “They are now used to help release stress, for general soothing,” said Demetra Lalaounis, the company’s director of international operations. And for those hoping to kick a bad habit during lockdown, they’re “also often used to help with quitting smoking,” she said.

One of Marla Aaron’s habits is connected to her profession as a jewelry designer. “I’m a huge fiddler,” Ms. Aaron said. “I derive a ridiculous amount of pleasure from playing with my jewelry.” Accordingly, she named her collection of kinetic jewelry the Fiddling Series.

Like most of the pieces in her eponymous line, the new series is heavily influenced by

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Even in a Pandemic, Fine Jewelry Is Selling

CORONA DEL MAR, CALIF. — Conventional wisdom suggests that a pandemic would not bode well for jewelry sales. But for Mark Patterson, a fine jewelry designer with a retail store in this coastal Southern California enclave, 2020 has defied expectations at every turn. (And he’s not alone.)

“Wholesale is down — we haven’t done any trunk shows — but our retail store has doubled sales from last year,” Mr. Patterson said in late October. “It’s crazy. We don’t know how to explain it.”

Actually, he did. “Big diamonds,” he said.

Mr. Patterson described a recent sale to a local couple: “They had plans to travel for their 20th anniversary — Europe or maybe Australia — and their trip was canceled due to Covid, so they decided to upgrade her diamond engagement ring from one carat to four carats,” Mr. Patterson said. “They spent close to $55,000.”

“People are realizing, ‘Wow, life is short, why don’t we get married?’” said Edahn Golan, a diamond and jewelry industry analyst based in Israel. “It’s all about love, emotions, the fragility of life.”

Mr. Golan said that, in the United States, retail jewelry sales in March and April fell by $3.8 billion compared with the same period in 2019 — retail stores there were closed in these early days of the pandemic.

Once lockdowns eased in June, July and August, however, sales for that period grew by $1 billion year over year. Engagement ring sales led the charge, he said.

Couples who tied the knot this year cut down on “guests, food, flowers, party favors,” Mr. Golan said. “The one area where there’s the least tendency to compromise is on the bride’s jewelry because it’s long-lasting, and ‘I gave up on everything else, why should I give up on this?’”

If the crisis has spurred people with means to buy jewelry as an expression of love, it’s inspired those with even greater means to look at it through an age-old lens: as a tangible form of wealth.

Gary Schuler, worldwide chairman of Sotheby’s jewelry department, saw that at the house’s Magnificent Jewels sale in Geneva last month, where the 14.83-carat Spirit of the Rose, a fancy vivid purple-pink diamond, sold for $26.6 million, making it the most valuable jewel auctioned in 2020.

“People are looking for hard assets,” Mr. Schuler said. “We’re seeing it in these and other categories we sell at Sotheby’s: contemporary art, old master paintings.”

All of these factors help explain why sales of fine jewelry, pieces priced at less than $50,000, have performed better than most luxury categories, said Luca Solca, senior research analyst for global luxury goods at Bernstein.

“The only caveat is high jewelry, which has suffered from the lack of opportunities to present products to potential customers (normally,

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‘Antiques Roadshow’ Jewelry Experts on Finds and Fancies

LONDON — They come by the thousands, carting carefully wrapped family heirlooms or even rummage sale finds, some cushioned in luxuriously padded original boxes, others merely nestled in a jacket pocket.

They all hope to be among the few selected to have their potential treasures valued by an “Antiques Roadshow” expert who will tell them what great-aunt Gladys’ Victorian emerald brooch or Grandfather’s diamond stickpin is worth. Some return home disappointed. A very few leave with a valuation exceeding $1 million.

Its producers say “Roadshow” is regularly watched by more than six million people in Britain, making it one of the most-viewed factual programs on the BBC. Networks in other countries, including the United States and Poland, have copied the formula for evaluating keepsakes in categories like jewelry, pottery, militaria and art.

In each episode, gemologists are on site — often a stately country home or museum — to help sift through items with the best back stories, have lively chats with the owners and estimate what the pieces might raise at auction. For the 17-episode season set to debut in January, Covid-19 has meant that viewers sent emails describing their valuables, and a few were invited to one of eight venues over eight weeks, including suburban London and the west coast of Scotland.

What does it take to catch an expert’s eye? Five “Roadshow” specialists weigh in on separating paste from provenance.

The comments, by email, have been edited and condensed.

I started on “Roadshow” in 2007. I ride Harley-Davidsons and other big motorbikes and sent a picture of me wearing leathers and pearls to the editor and asked if he was interested in a jewelry specialist who rides motorbikes.

One of my favorite finds was a Lawrence Wheaton tourmaline ring in 2016. I was able to find out who made it and eventually had the piece hallmarked with his initials. Mr. Wheaton was remembered, and the pleasure and pride his family got from seeing the follow-up episode of the ring being hallmarked was very special. A goldsmith’s being remembered and not forgotten is so important. Also very moving was an emerald and diamond ring that had been worn by a survivor of the Titanic as she was rescued from the sinking ship.

I am passionate about all styles of jewelry as long as they have the three main ingredients: great craftsmanship, good design and a good sense of movement. If it moves, I want to see how it articulates or if it has the suggestion of movement. Can you imagine the butterfly brooch flying off your shoulder?

I left school at age 17 and applied for the job of junior assistant at a wonderful antique jewelry shop called Cameo Corner, 50 yards from the gates of the British Museum. I had always loved mythology as a boy, and at my interview was shown a tray of cameo brooches carved with classical heads. I identified most of the subjects and got the job.

A favorite for me was a

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New Brand To Know: Roxanne Rajcoomar-Hadden Jewelry

Jewelry designer Roxanne Rajcoomar-Hadden’s penchant for jewelry has led her to create pieces for a select group of friends and clients before launching her brand in 2013. The London-based jeweler is known for employing fairtrade materials and ethically sourced stones. A graduate of the London College of Fashion, Rajcommar-Hadde learned her craft at the Rough Diamond training at De Beers, then Diamond Grading at GIA. Based in Fulham, West London, her jewelry collection is sold on rrhjewellery.com.

What inspired you to launch your label? 

For years I wanted to wear pieces that suited my style, aesthetic, and that carried a story that resonated with me. After working in fine jewelry for many years, I moved to Melbourne with my husband. I was so inspired by Australian creativity and their love and support for independent brands. I was drawn to their freedom to be creative and I realized there weren’t very many London-based independent brands designing everyday statement jewelry. I started designing my own collection alongside taking a local silversmithing course – I fell in love with the processes, and that I was capable of being able to adorn someone with jewelry I had created, and so my brand was born. 

Why jewelry? 

I can’t remember a time in my life when I wasn’t obsessed with jewelry. When I was a child I used to visit my cousins at the weekend and spend my time rooting through their drawers looking at their jewels. I used to  ‘borrow’ a few pieces and keep them in an empty Kleenex box under my bed, and I would look at them after my lights went out to see them sparkle just before the light left them. I used to hear stories of my grandfather, who passed before I was born, being a goldsmith back in Guyana. I longed to know more and loved seeing his creations. 

At school, I decided to study fashion because jewelry didn’t seem like an option. Once I discovered the jewelry industry there was no turning back for me. I visit the jewelry room at the Victoria & Albert Museum almost weekly (pre-Covid), I still get the feeling of it being the first time every time I walk in, a wholesome feeling that I have never felt with anything else. I find it so incredibly fascinating that these precious stones are formed under the Earth’s surface. For me, the life of a diamond is one of the most fascinating formations known to man, and I feel so privileged to work with them every day. 

With my bespoke commissions, I love being able to tell my clients’ stories through the jewelry I design. I think of jewelry as quite autobiographical for the wearer. Everyone has a story to tell, no matter how big or small and I love being a part of that. 

I would say jewelry is in my DNA, it is part of me and part of my

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