NIOSH N95 masks, $21 wireless earbuds, free $50 Amazon gift card deal, 4K smart TVs, more



a close up of a box: Amazon Deals


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Amazon Deals

We’ve got some spectacular daily deals to share with you on Wednesday, which should come as a surprise since we’re halfway through Cyber Week 2020. What is a surprise, however, is that an apparent Amazon mistake has made actual NIOSH N95 face masks available to anyone that should be restricted to hospitals and government agencies. 20-packs of ZYB-11 N95 respirators are available right now at Amazon, and they’re actually discounted, no less. If Amazon fixes its mistake or if you’d rather not take N95 supply from hospitals, FDA-authorized Powecom KN95 masks and AccuMed KN95 masks are certified by NIOSH to work just as well as N95 masks, and they’re both discounted right now.

Other top daily deals today include shocking discounts on Purell hand sanitizer pump bottles that are impossible to find in stores, equally shocking discounts on Purell half-gallon pump jugs, a free $50 Amazon gift card when you get a Microsoft 365 subscription that you need need to renew each year anyway, a new all-time low price for the amazing Phyn Smart Water Assistant and Leak Detector that can detect water leaking or even dripping anywhere in your house like magic, AirPods 2 with Wireless Charging Case for less than they cost on Black Friday, the awesome Roomba 675 robot vacuum for only $179, the incredible self-emptying Roomba i7+ for $599 instead of $1,000, terrific Instant Pot deals starting at $59.99, TrueFree+ true wireless earbuds with more than 10,000 5-star ratings for only $20.99, massive 75-inch 4K smart TVs from LG and Samsung starting at just $896.99, and plenty more.

See all of Wednesday’s top deals down below!

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Fine for not wearing masks, promote online shopping: SOPs for markets



Photo for representational purpose


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Photo for representational purpose

Imposing fines for not wearing masks or not following physical distancing, opening markets on alternate days and closing them if large number of coronavirus cases are reported, are among the measures recommended by the Centre to ensure compliance to COVID-19-appropriate behaviour in markets.

The standard operating procedures for markets issued by the Union Health Ministry on Monday to contain spread of coronavirus infection, stated that online booking of groceries and doorstep delivery of those must be encouraged while incentives or discounts for those who shop during non-peak hours may be considered.

The SOPs outlined that market places in containment zones shall remain closed. Shop owners and employees living in containment zones shall not be allowed entry into marketplaces, it stated.

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According to the SOPs, COVID-19-appropriate behaviour in marketplaces may be regulated by market associations through a number of measures, including creation of a sub-committee for each market to facilitate and monitor implementation of such behaviour in marketplaces.

It also suggested setting up mask dispensing kiosks at government-approved rates at entry points of markets and parking lots, establishing hand washing stations in public utility areas while recommending use of foot operated taps and contactless soap dispensers.

It also sought for providing mass thermal screening provisions at the entry and access points to the market, procuring thermal guns, sanitizers, disinfectants for sanitization of public utility areas and placement of IEC materials and signages regarding Covid appropriate behaviour in prominent locations. 

“Where self-regulatory approach fails or lacks impact, the planning shall also entail taking enforcement actions, wherever warranted. This may include levying of fines/penalties on defaulters for not wearing mask/face cover, or for not following physical distancing norms.

“Exploring the option of allowing markets/shops to open on alternate days and closure of markets in case larger number of cases are getting reported which are found to be having epidemiological links with the market by the administration,” the SOPs stated.

The ministry said market places are visited by a large number of people. With gradual opening of economic activities, markets are witnessing high footfalls, it said.

“Such large gatherings, without observance of COVID-19 appropriate behaviour have the potential to spread coronavirus infection,” the SOP document stated.

It also suggested strategies that can be worked out by the law enforcing agencies in collaboration with market associations to manage crowd such as engaging civil defence volunteers, home guards and volunteers to regulate crowd, accessing control at parking lots for limiting vehicle entry and exploring staggered time of shops and utilities, thereby allowing them to remain open for a longer duration.

“Crowd density does not remain the same throughout. It usually peaks during evening hours on weekdays. On weekends and holidays, marketplaces are crowded for most of the day till late in the evening. Planning should specifically factor-in requirement for these peak days/hours,” the document noted.

According to the guidelines, at the entry point of shops, all employees and visitors should undergo mandatory hand hygiene and thermal

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North Bergen fashion designer donates 405 masks to county school district

When the coronavirus put a North Bergen-based designer’s plan to launch her own line on hold, she channeled her passion for fashion into a burgeoning face covering business.

Last week Pilar Posada, founder of FacecoverUS, donated 405 masks to the Hudson County Schools of Technology for teachers, faculty and staff district wide.

To date, the company has distributed over 5,000 free face masks to frontline workers and other local organizations.

“We started at the beginning of the pandemic making masks for local charities,” Posada said. “Quickly once a family member finds out you can make a mask everyone starts messaging you for some and it just grew and grew to the point where we couldn’t keep up.

“We quickly threw up the Shopify site and wanted to keep our commitment to donating to local charities and give donations to the community. Shortly after that, we decided we would donate one for every three sold and because of our customers we’re able to make donations like this.”

The donation of masks, which have three layers with an adjustable ear strap and nose wire, is arriving at the right time. Like the rest of the state, Hudson County is experiencing a second wave of COVID-19. Jersey City reported 118 new cases Thursday, while Hudson County reported 578 new cases on Nov. 25.

“Since the beginning of the pandemic, our top priority at the Hudson County Schools of Technology has been to keep our students, faculty and staff safe during these trying times,” Superintendent Amy Lin-Rodriguez said. The generous donation from a local small business is a tremendous act of kindness — one that will help those who step onto our campuses to stay healthy. “

Accepting the donations on behalf of the district were John Shinnick, HCST’s school safety specialist, Dr. Joseph Giammarella, principal of High Tech High School and William Mattei, vice principal of County Prep High School.

“Despite the challenges small businesses have faced over the past several months, it is remarkable to see people like FacecoversUs continue to find ways to support local frontline workers, including the teachers at High Tech High School,” Giammarella said.

Face covering donation at HCST

Face coverings donated to the Hudson County Schools of Technology by FacecoverUS founder Pilar Posada. (HCST photo)HCST

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Black Friday stores safety rules to keep shoppers safe: curbside pickup, masks

  • Several stores have added additional safety precautions ahead of the Black Friday shopping frenzy to protect both customers and employees.
  • We spoke to three experts to find out which precautions will actually help.
  • The experts agree that enforcing mask-wearing and social distancing are good, but mandates like reducing store hours may be unhelpful or detrimental.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Several big-name retail stores have added additional in-store safety precautions ahead of the

Black Friday
shopping frenzy, and we spoke to three experts to find out which precautions will actually help the most.

Major stores across the country have implemented a variety of safety mandates to keep shoppers and employees safe on the historically frenzied Black Friday shopping day as coronavirus cases continue to surge in the US. For example, some stores — including JCPenney and Lowe’s— are offering contactless curbside pick-up, and others —  such as Home Depot and  T.J. Maxx — are requiring face masks.

The three experts we spoke to all agree that contactless curbside pickup and mandating face mask-wearing — retail protocols that have become normalized since the beginning of the pandemic — are beneficial to help stop the spread of COVID-19.

“We have data that show that large congregations of people, especially indoors, will lead to an outbreak,” Dr. Jill Weatherhead, an assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine, told Business Insider in an interview. “These other strategies [besides mask wearing] are really coming off of the knowledge that if we reduce people being in close contact by doing these other extra steps, hopefully, we can reduce transmission if people choose to go into stores.”

Read more: REI gives its employees a paid day off on Black Friday, but hourly workers say that it’s a ‘marketing move’ and that the company has strayed from its co-op roots

Stephen Kissler, an infectious disease researcher at Harvard’s School of Public Health, thinks the most important action stores can do is limit the number of customers inside — a mandate Walmart recently reinstated — to decrease the chances of a superspreader event. Weatherhead notes that setting a cap on the number of in-store customers will be helpful as long as it doesn’t create crowds of people waiting in close contact outside the store.

Mitigating the possibility of overcrowded stores

Black Friday

Black Friday.

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Stores like Michaels and Nordstrom will also be limiting store hours. However, Dr. Stanley Perlman, a professor at the University of Iowa’s Carver College of Medicine, states this “may not be helpful if other rules are followed.”

Both Kissler and Weatherhead take this a step further by expressing their concern over the strategy, stating that it may instead “backfire,” according to Kissler. 

“If you have more limited store hours, will it then lead to more crowded stores when stores are open?” Weatherhead said. “It doesn’t seem like there would be a benefit to limiting store hours in terms of reducing viral transmission.”

Weatherhead and Kissler suggest that stores should instead take the opposite

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Japan fights coronavirus in luxurious style with million-yen masks

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japanese trend-setters can now protect against the coronavirus in luxurious style with opulent masks adorned with diamonds and pearls for a cool million yen ($9,600) each.

Cox Co’s Mask.com chain began selling the hand-made masks last week, with the aim of cheering up people and spurring sales in a fashion industry depressed by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The diamond masks are embellished with a 0.7 carat diamond and more than 300 pieces of Swarovski crystal, while the pearl masks contain some 330 Japanese Akoya pearls.

“Everyone is feeling down because of the coronavirus and it would be great if they could feel better by looking at one of these glittering masks,” Azusa Kajitaka, a mask concierge at the company’s store near Tokyo station, told Reuters on Wednesday.

“The jewellery and fabric industries have also been in a slump because of the coronavirus and so we did this as part of a project to help revitalise Japan,” she added.

Cox, part of retailing group Aeon Co, has opened Mask.com online and in six physical locations since September, offering more than 200 types of masks starting at 500 yen.

Some visitors to the store on Wednesday were concerned the million-yen masks might be out of their league.

“If I wear one of these face masks, I have to wear suitable fashion to match it. So I think it’s a bit embarrassing (to dress up),” said 66-year-old Mitsue Kaneko.

The Japanese masks are still far from the world’s most expensive. That honour belongs to a $1.5 million mask made with 250 grams of 18 karat gold designed by Israeli jeweller Yvel.

($1 = 104.4900 yen)

Reporting by Akira Tomoshige; Writing by Chris Gallagher; Editing by Christian Schmollinger

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Japan Fights Coronavirus in Luxurious Style With Million-Yen Masks | World News

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japanese trend-setters can now protect against the coronavirus in luxurious style with opulent masks adorned with diamonds and pearls for a cool million yen ($9,600) each.

Cox Co’s Mask.com chain began selling the hand-made masks last week, with the aim of cheering up people and spurring sales in a fashion industry depressed by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The diamond masks are embellished with a 0.7 carat diamond and more than 300 pieces of Swarovski crystal, while the pearl masks contain some 330 Japanese Akoya pearls.

“Everyone is feeling down because of the coronavirus and it would be great if they could feel better by looking at one of these glittering masks,” Azusa Kajitaka, a mask concierge at the company’s store near Tokyo station, told Reuters on Wednesday.

“The jewellery and fabric industries have also been in a slump because of the coronavirus and so we did this as part of a project to help revitalise Japan,” she added.

Cox, part of retailing group Aeon Co, has opened Mask.com online and in six physical locations since September, offering more than 200 types of masks starting at 500 yen.

Some visitors to the store on Wednesday were concerned the million-yen masks might be out of their league.

“If I wear one of these face masks, I have to wear suitable fashion to match it. So I think it’s a bit embarrassing (to dress up),” said 66-year-old Mitsue Kaneko.

The Japanese masks are still far from the world’s most expensive. That honour belongs to a $1.5 million mask made with 250 grams of 18 karat gold designed by Israeli jeweller Yvel.

(Reporting by Akira Tomoshige; Writing by Chris Gallagher; Editing by Christian Schmollinger)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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