MTV Entertainment Group Commits $250 Million to Drive Content From Women- and BIPOC-Owned Production Companies

Actor, director

Already on an awards tear, King made her feature film directorial debut with “One Night in Miami,” which premiered at the Venice Film Festival, and then proceeded to pick up her fourth Emmy — this time for her performance in “Watchmen” — two weeks later. There are normal mid-career Hollywood renaissances, and then there’s whatever you call King’s past half-decade. A working actor since the mid-1980s, with roles in “Boyz N the Hood,” “Friday” and “Jerry Maguire,” King has won a Golden Globe and an Oscar for acting in addition to her Emmys within the past five years. Adapted from Kemp Powers’ play, “One Night in Miami” features a speculative imagining of a real-life 1964 meeting of the minds between Malcolm X, Sam Cooke, Jim Brown and boxer Cassius Clay, soon to change his name to Muhammad Ali. King had directed TV episodes before, but her debut feature offered plenty of fresh wrinkles. “The biggest challenge was to make it not feel like a play,” King says. “That outcome may have been inevitable in certain moments. But I felt Kemp’s dialogue was so powerful that with the right actors those moments, if they came up, would be forgiven. We spend quite a bit of time in one room. So we decided to use artistic license and make the room considerably bigger than what the actual room would have been. To help lean into the vitality of these men, we decided to keep the camera moving at all times throughout the film.” Featuring discursive, playful and, at times, incendiary exchanges between these four famous men, “Miami” often can’t help but feel like it’s speaking directly to the present moment, which was something King didn’t hesitate to lean into. “The discussions between Malcolm and Sam were happening before anyone knew about a Malcolm X or a Sam Cooke, so for Black people the moment is always now, regardless of what year the conversation is taking place.” And for that reason, King felt it important to move full-steam ahead with the film’s rollout — it will receive a limited Christmas release before hitting Amazon Prime in early January — despite the pandemic. “With all of the devastation we are in the midst of, I believe we are at a precipice,” King says. “We felt strongly that if this film can have a positive impact on anyone at this juncture, we should get it out there.” — Andrew Barker

View the full Article

Source Article

Read more

Georgia State University Receives $2 Million Gift in Memory of Days Inns Founder to Establish Hospitality Immersion Program

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Atlanta, Dec 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE via COMTEX) —
Atlanta, Dec. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Cecil B. Day School of Hospitality Administration at Georgia State University’s J. Mack Robinson College of Business has received a $2 million endowment from Deen Day Sanders to establish an immersion program in memory of her late husband, Days Inns founder and school namesake, Cecil B. Day, Sr.

The endowment will be used to develop the Cecil B. Day Immersion Program to provide graduate and undergraduate hospitality students semester-long experiential learning opportunities tailored to their specific career aspirations. The majority of the gift will be used to provide scholarships and academic aid to make it possible for students of all backgrounds to participate.

Whether studying domestically or abroad, participants will take part in signature experiences that demonstrate internationally renowned examples of quality operations across all sectors of hospitality including lodging, food and beverage, event management and entertainment. Following a semester of hands-on projects, mentorship from hospitality leaders and networking, students will emerge with a greater understanding of corporate processes, analytical approaches, and strategies for innovation.

“It is with great honor and tremendous gratitude to the Day family that we accept this gift and embark on the creation of the Cecil B. Day Immersion Program,” said Debra Cannon, director of the Cecil B. Day School of Hospitality Administration. “Cecil B. Day was a pioneering innovator and marketing genius, and we are thrilled to further his legacy through this new program. During a time when our industry needs innovation the most, this student-centric gift has the power to transform careers and change lives.”

The competitive application and selection process for the Cecil B. Day Immersion Program will open in fall 2021, after which admitted students will participate in professional development workshops to prepare for the experience.

Robinson’s School of Hospitality Administration was renamed the Cecil B. Day School of Hospitality Administration in 1988. Cecil B. Day is remembered as an astute businessman who developed Days Inns to national prominence throughout the course of his career. His family’s legacy of excellence and philanthropy is the foundation upon which the program bases its vision for preparing future generations of hospitality executives.

The Cecil B. Day School of Hospitality Administration is the oldest and largest hospitality administration school in Georgia. It offers certificate, bachelors, and master’s-level programs. CEOWORLD ranks it 22nd among the world’s top hospitality and hotel management schools, and Eduniversal ranks the school’s Regynald G. Washington Master of Global Hospitality Management 24th worldwide.

Learn more about the Cecil B. Day School of Hospitality Administration at https://robinson.gsu.edu/hospitality.

About Georgia State University’s J. Mack Robinson College of Business

Georgia State University’s J. Mack Robinson College of Business is 8th among accredited U.S. business colleges for graduate enrollment, according to the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB). More Georgia executives hold advanced degrees from Robinson and Georgia State than any other U.S. institution.

Read more

Northern Vermont University gets $3.5 million gift

LYNDON, Vt. (AP) —

Northern Vermont University has received a $3.5 million gift from an alumnus of Lyndon State College.

The school announced Monday that the gift from Mark Valade is the largest in the Vermont State College System’s history.

Valade is the CEO of Carhartt, Inc., and the great-grandson of the founder of Carhartt, Hamilton Carhartt, the Caledonian Record reported. Lyndon State College merged with Johnson State College in 2018 to create Northern Vermont University.

The donation will help build the NVU Learning and Working Community, which is a partnership between the institution and local businesses and organizations to provide hands-on learning opportunities and career pathways for students, the university said.


NVU President Elaine Collins said in a statement that the school is grateful for “this transformative gift.” The NVU Learning and Working Community “will help drive entrepreneurship, innovation and professional development, encouraging our students to stay in Vermont to pursue their dreams while also helping to meet our state’s workforce needs,” she said.

Valade said he hopes other alumni and friends will support the new, innovative direction in teaching that NVU has undertaken.

“NVU plays such an important role in the lives of its students and is vital to northern Vermont,” he said in a statement.

Source Article

Read more

OSU’s COVID-19 TRACE project gets $2 million gift for national expansion

Oregon State University’s project that helps find how widespread COVID-19 is in a community will soon expand across the nation. 



a person standing in a room: Tracer staff bring samples back to their staging area in Eugene.


© Chris Pietsch/The Register-Guard
Tracer staff bring samples back to their staging area in Eugene.

OSU’s TRACE project sent people from the university into communities, knocking on doors and asking people to voluntarily submit a sample to see if they have COVID-19. The purpose is to get a better picture of how prevalent the virus really is in a community, because not everybody has access to testing or may be asymptomatic. 

The program started in April in the Corvallis area, and has since expanded to communities like Eugene, Bend and Newport. Now, with a $2 million gift from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, OSU will create a national TRACE Center and expand the project to interested communities across the nation, a university news release said. 

“The number of confirmed cases in a community is different than the number of people who have the virus,” Ben Dalziel, director of the project and assistant professor in OSU’s College of Science, told The Register-Guard. “Not everyone has access to testing and because folks can be asymptomatic yet still transmit. The value proposition of the center is to try to estimate the number of people in the community (who) are infected with the virus at a particular time, which continues to be relevant, as much or even more so heading into this new sort of phase with the vaccine hopefully rolling out.”

More than 100 research universities across the nation have the capacity to roll out the TRACE project in their own areas, Dalziel said, and many institutions have expressed interest in the project, which spurred the expansion. 

Right now the project is designed to be run through a university-public health partnership, so OSU spokesman Steve Clark said it’s likely they’ll expand it through universities and colleges. But it could be in areas where there isn’t a college or university, and the county public health department chooses to take it on instead. 

“Institutions could include colleges, universities and local health departments,” Clark said. 

The new national center is open to changing up its approach since one-size-fits-all won’t apply. 

“One thing that’s important with the center is to make sure that whatever happens in a particular community is tailored to that community,” Dalziel said. “So we’re not going to come in and say ‘this is how you do it.’ It’s going to be a two-way endeavor.”

The new national center won’t require any new brick and mortar additions to campus. Its employees will still work at OSU, with a focus on the TRACE Center. The $2 million will mostly go toward full-time positions in the center that will focus on consulting with the communities in other states running the project.

There will also be some funding delegated to making sure they have the right infrastructure for storing and collecting all the data, especially because managing private health information can be a heavy lift

Read more

Group Seeking Equality for Women in Tech Raises $11 Million

SAN FRANCISCO — Two years ago, fed up with stories of harassment and discrimination in Silicon Valley, a group of female venture capitalists formed a nonprofit called All Raise to focus on women’s equality.

This week, the group raised $11 million toward a target of $15 million from backers including Pivotal Ventures, the investment firm of Melinda Gates; the Reid Hoffman Foundation; and GGV Capital. The money will fund expansion plans for the next three years, said Pam Kostka, All Raise’s chief executive. It previously raised $4 million in 2018.

“We’re moving as aggressively as we can to change the ecosystem,” Ms. Kostka said.

In two years, All Raise built a network of 20,000 people across four U.S. tech hubs. The industry began adding more female investors, who now make up 13 percent of the venture industry, compared with 9 percent before. All Raise said it aimed to help push that number to 18 percent by 2028.

Yet many challenges remain. Roughly two-thirds of venture capital firms still have no female partners. Venture capital funding going to women entrepreneurs stagnated over the last year at around 12 percent. Women own just 11 percent of founder and employee equity in start-ups, according to a study conducted by Carta, a financial technology start-up.

And by some measures, harassment has worsened, according to a recent survey from Women Who Tech, a nonprofit. Forty-four percent of female founders said they had been harassed. Two-thirds said they had been propositioned for sex, up 9 percent from 2017, and one-third said they had been groped, up 7 percent from 2017.

More broadly, bigger tech companies, which began publishing diversity statistics on their work forces six years ago and have poured millions of dollars into diversity efforts, are nowhere close to gender parity and have shown even less progress on hiring more Black and Latino workers. This year, the World Economic Forum concluded that it would take women 257 years to close the employment gender gap across all industries, compared with its previous estimate of 202 years.

“We are not going to take hundreds of years of stereotyping and systemic oppression and turn that around overnight,” Ms. Kostka said. “But are we making more tangible progress? Yes.”

All Raise helps peer groups, boot camps, and mentorship programs for female and nonbinary investors and founders. It also produces data reports on the start-up industry, publishes a directory of vetted speakers and runs a program for Black female founders, When Founder Met Funder. With the new money, it plans to establish chapters in more cities and offer more programs, which it said were “oversubscribed.”

Ms. Kostka said the demand for All Raise’s programs showed that the tech industry’s lack of diversity was not caused by a lack of talent or interest from women and minorities. “We don’t have a pipeline problem,” she said. “We have a talent network problem.”

At a summit in October, 700 of its members gathered online for a virtual networking event. The mood was celebratory

Read more

Group Seeking Equality for Women in Tech Raises $15 Million

SAN FRANCISCO — Two years ago, fed up with stories of harassment and discrimination in Silicon Valley, a group of female venture capitalists formed a nonprofit called All Raise to focus on women’s equality.

This week, the group raised $15 million from backers including Pivotal Ventures, the investment firm of Melinda Gates; the Reid Hoffman Foundation; and GGV Capital. The money will fund expansion plans for the next three years, said Pam Kostka, All Raise’s chief executive. It previously raised $4 million in 2018.

“We’re moving as aggressively as we can to change the ecosystem,” Ms. Kostka said.

In two years, All Raise built a network of 20,000 people across four U.S. tech hubs. The industry began adding more female investors, who now make up 13 percent of the venture industry, compared with 9 percent before. All Raise said it aims to help push that number to 18 percent by 2028.

Yet many challenges remain. Roughly two-thirds of venture capital firms still have no female partners. Venture capital funding going to women entrepreneurs stagnated over the last year at around 12 percent. Women own just 11 percent of founder and employee equity in start-ups, according to a study conducted by Carta, a financial technology start-up.

And by some measures, harassment has worsened, according to a recent survey from Women Who Tech, a nonprofit. Forty-four percent of female founders said they had been harassed. Two-thirds said they had been propositioned for sex, up 9 percent from 2017, and one-third said they had been groped, up 7 percent from 2017.

More broadly, bigger tech companies, which began publishing diversity statistics on their work forces six years ago and have poured millions of dollars into diversity efforts, are nowhere close to gender parity and have shown even less progress on hiring more Black and Latino workers. This year, the World Economic Forum concluded that it would take women 257 years to close the employment gender gap across all industries, compared with its previous estimate of 202 years.

“We are not going to take hundreds of years of stereotyping and systemic oppression and turn that around overnight,” Ms. Kostka said. “But are we making more tangible progress? Yes.”

All Raise helps peer groups, boot camps and mentorship programs for female and nonbinary investors and founders. It also produces data reports on the start-up industry, publishes a directory of vetted speakers and runs a program for Black female founders, When Founder Met Funder. With the new money, it plans to establish chapters in more cities and offer more programs, which it said were “oversubscribed.”

Ms. Kostka said the demand for All Raise’s programs shows the tech industry’s lack of diversity is not caused by a lack of talent or interest from women and minorities. “We don’t have a pipeline problem,” she said. “We have a talent network problem.”

At a summit in October, 700 of its members gathered online for a virtual networking event. The mood was celebratory as Ms. Kostka rattled off success stories

Read more

Government Model Suggests U.S. COVID-19 Cases Could Be Approaching 100 Million : Coronavirus Updates : NPR

A healthcare worker processes people in line at a United Memorial Medical Center COVID-19 testing site on Nov. 19, in Houston. Texas is rushing thousands of additional medical staff to overworked hospitals as the number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients increases.

David J. Phillip/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

David J. Phillip/AP

A healthcare worker processes people in line at a United Memorial Medical Center COVID-19 testing site on Nov. 19, in Houston. Texas is rushing thousands of additional medical staff to overworked hospitals as the number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients increases.

David J. Phillip/AP

The actual number of coronavirus infections in the U.S. reached nearly 53 million at the end of September and could be approaching 100 million now, according to a model developed by government researchers.

The model, created by scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, calculated that the true number of infections is about 8 times the reported number, which includes only the cases confirmed by a laboratory test.

Preliminary estimates using the model found that by the end of September, 52.9 million people had been infected, while the number of laboratory-confirmed infections was just 6.9 million, the team reported in the Nov. 25 issue of the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

“This indicates that approximately 84% of the U.S. population has not yet been infected and thus most of the country remains at risk,” the authors wrote.

Since then, the CDC’s tally of confirmed infections has increased to 12.5 million. So if the model’s ratio still holds, the estimated total would now be greater than 95 million, leaving about 71% of the population uninfected.

The model attempts to account for the fact that most cases of COVID-19 are mild or asymptomatic and go unreported.

Scientists used studies looking for people who have antibodies to the coronavirus in their blood – an indication that they were infected at some time — to estimate how many infections went undetected. Some of these antibody studies have suggested that only about one in 10 coronavirus infections is reported.

The goal in creating the model was to “better quantify the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the healthcare system and society,” the authors wrote.

The model also estimated that official counts do not include more than a third of the people hospitalized with COVID-19.

Source Article

Read more

See inside Seth Rogen’s $2.1 million Spanish-style Hollywood bungalow

Seth Rogen attends the premiere of Universal Pictures’ “Blockers” at Regency Village Theatre in 2018 in Westwood, California.


Christopher Polk/Getty Images

The actor Seth Rogen has listed his longtime Hollywood home for $2,125,000. The home landed on the market early last month, and is currently in pending sale status.

Rogen purchased the charming Spanish-style bungalow back in 2006, for $1.65 million.

Behind a gate, this hidden oasis is described as a “magical Zen retreat” in the listing details, with four bedrooms and three bathrooms on 2,853 square feet.

It’s a classic Southern California living space that features a seamless flow between indoor and outdoor living, with ponds and seating areas perfectly situated for entertaining family and guests.

Built nearly a century ago, in 1923, the charming residence has dark hardwood floors throughout. The open living and dining area includes a cozy fireplace and French doors that lead to the quaint outdoor space.

On the second level, the spacious master suite spans the entire floor. It features vaulted ceilings, a fireplace, walk-in closet, and spa bathroom. There are two additional bedrooms, and a den could be used as a fourth bedroom.

Front exterior of Seth Rogen’s home in Hollywood


realtor.com

Living area


realtor.com

Kitchen


realtor.com

Dining room


realtor.com

Master bedroom


realtor.com

Master bathroom


realtor.com

Outdoor living area with fireplace


realtor.com

Back patio and sitting area


realtor.com

The property also has a two-car garage with an extra parking space.

Earlier this year, Rogen paid $1.93 million for a similar Spanish-style gated bungalow from 1924. Located in West Hollywood, the three-bedroom home was freshly remodeled.

According to Architectural Digest, it was once owned by the Hollywood publicist Stephen Huvane.

When it was on the market, the home was described as “perfectly designed for entertaining, with an open floor-plan, abundant French doors to the outside and music wired throughout.”

A large master suite offers custom French doors that open to the shaded and private backyard. Outside is a pool and spa, plus a newly completed barbecue deck with plenty of seating to entertain guests. A recently remodeled, spacious poolhouse could be used as an office/study or game room.

Rogen’s new Spanish bungalow


realtor.com

Kitchen


realtor.com

Living area


realtor.com

Poolhouse


realtor.com

Backyard patio and pool


realtor.com

Rogen, 38, is one of Hollywood’s busiest actors and writers, with credits as a producer and director. He’s starred in a number of iconic comedy roles, including “Pineapple Express,” “This Is the End,” and “Superbad.”

Jane Gavens with Compass holds the listing for Rogen’s longtime Hollywood home.

This story was originally published on Realtor.com

Source Article

Read more

COVID Cases Could Top 20 Million in January

“You’ve got to use some common sense in the situation that you’re in,” he said. “The safest thing you can do is to confine the activities in your own home with the immediate occupants of that home.”

Travel, social gatherings, and relaxed public health behaviors in the coming months could lead to a “surge superimposed upon a surge” already happening, Fauci said. Cases, hospitalizations, and deaths lag by weeks, so what’s happening now will show up in official reports in 2 or 3 weeks, he said.

More than 3 million infections have been reported so far in November, which is the most reported in 1 month this year, according to CNN. Hospitalizations are also at a high, with nearly 86,000 patients in hospitals across the country on Monday, according to the COVID Tracking Project. Hospitalization numbers have broken records for 14 days in a row.

Individual states are reporting major increases in hospitalizations as well. In California, hospitalizations jumped 77% during the past 2 weeks, CNN reported, and in Ohio, hospitalizations increased 59% in 2 weeks. State officials are warning that intensive care unit beds could be gone within the week. Health care workers are posting on social media about burnout and overwhelming work.

On top of that, COVID-19 deaths will continue to increase in coming months. More than 10,000 people have died from the coronavirus in the past week, CNN reported. Another 130,000 people could die by next month, according to a new projection from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

“What kind of Thanksgiving we have is going to go a long way to determining what December looks like, what our holiday season is going to look like,” Scott Harris, MD, the state health officer for Alabama, said Monday during a media briefing.

He said the state’s numbers look worse than ever and that hospitalizations are reaching July levels, when hospitals ran out of room for patients. He encouraged people to think about their vulnerable family members when making holiday plans.

“Are we going to be here a month from now, trying to have the same conversation?” he asked. “I really, really hope not.”

Source Article

Read more