Global Mouse Model Services Market Supply-Demand and Rising Trends to Play a Key Role In Growth 2021-2030

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Dec 04, 2020 (WiredRelease via Comtex) —
The latest research report provides a complete assessment of the Global Mouse Model Services market for the forecast year 2021-2030, which is beneficial for companies regardless of their size and revenue. This Survey report covering the major market insights and industry approach towards COVID-19 in the upcoming years. The Mouse Model Services Market Report presents data and information on the development of the investment structure, technological improvements, market trends and developments, capabilities, and comprehensive information on the key players of the Mouse Model Services Market. The market strategies undertaken, with respect to the current and future scenario of the industry, have also been listed in the study.

The report begins with a brief presentation and overview of the Mouse Model Services market, about the current market landscape, market trends, major market players, product type, application, and region. It also includes the impact of COVID-19 on the global Mouse Model Services market trends, future forecasts, growth opportunities, end-user industries, and market players. It also provides historical data, current market scenario and future insights on Mouse Model Services market.

You Can Also Request Absolutely Free Sample Copy at – https://market.us/report/mouse-model-services-market/request-sample/

*** NOTE: Our team of industry researchers are studying Covid-19 and its impact on the growth of the Mouse Model Services market and where necessary we will consider Covid19 Footmark for better analysis of the market and industries. Contact us cogently for more detailed information.***

This study provides a comprehensive understanding of market value with MarketWatch stock utilization, product price, demand, gross margin, and supply of the Mouse Model Services market. The competitive perspective section of the report presents a clear insight into the market share analysis of the major players in the industry. The major vendors covered: Charles River Laboratories, Envigo, Taconic Biosciences, Jackson Laboratory, Crown Biosciences, Shanghai SLAC, Shangghai Modelorg, GenOway, Syngene International, Psychogenics, Pharmaron, Pharmalegacy, Horizon Discovery Group, Vi.

Research analysts take the demand and size of the market and further validate themselves with the market experts. In addition, raw materials and instrumentation and demand analysis are managed downstream. The researchers focused on the new purposes of the market and implemented a comprehensive study of current market situations.

Mouse Model Services market research report will be sympathetic for:

– New Investors

– Propose investors and private equity companies

– Cautious business organizers and analysts

– Intelligent network security Suppliers, Manufacturers and Distributors

– Government and research organizations

– Speculation / Business Research League

– End-use industries

– And much more

Request For Covid-19 Impact Analysis On Mouse Model Services Market: https://market.us/request-covid-19/?report_id=41942

Mouse Model Services Market Segments Evaluated in the Report:

Competitive Spectrum – Top Companies Participating in the Mouse Model Services Market are:

Charles River Laboratories

Envigo

Taconic Biosciences

Jackson Laboratory

Crown Biosciences

Shanghai SLAC

Shangghai Modelorg

GenOway

Syngene International

Psychogenics

Pharmaron

Pharmalegacy

Horizon Discovery Group

Vi

Mouse Model Services Product Overview:

Outbred

Inbred

Hybrid

Immunodeficient

Other

Classified Applications

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Repurposed mouse model sheds light on spectrum of COVID-19 disease symptoms

A repurposed mouse model can develop symptoms of both severe COVID-19 (lung damage, blood clots, abnormal blood vessels, and death) and also of milder disease, including loss of the sense of smell, according to a recent University of Iowa study published in Nature.

The study also showed that convalescent plasma from a patient who had recovered from COVID-19 protected the mice against lethal disease. The findings suggest the K18-hACE2 mouse model is useful for understanding a spectrum of COVID-19 disease symptoms, and for developing and testing new treatments.

When COVID-19 started spreading across the world earlier this year, UI researchers Stanley Perlman, MD, PhD, and Paul McCray, MD, realized that a mouse model they had created a decade earlier to study SARS might be an invaluable tool for understanding the concerning new disease and for testing potential treatments.

In the new study, Perlman, McCray, and colleagues present a detailed characterization of the effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection in these K18-hACE2 mice, which are now readily available from Jackson Laboratories.

Infection with a high dose of the virus produced many of the signs of illness seen in people with severe COVID-19, including severe lung damage, abnormalities in blood vessels known as vasculitis, blood clots, and death.

The mouse develops pretty robust lung disease that is on the severe end of the spectrum. That gives us an opportunity to investigate what’s going on with lung disease with COVID. Also, people who die from this disease often have vasculitis, which is unusual for coronavirus infections, and we found that the mice may develop signs of vasculitis in the liver, lung, and brain.”


Paul McCray, UI professor of pediatrics-pulmonology, and of microbiology and immunology, and the Roy J. Carver Chair in Pulmonary Research

One particularly interesting finding was that the infected mice lost their sense of smell. This effect, also known as anosmia, is seen in a large proportion of people who get COVID-19, but is not well understood.

The study showed that K18-hACE2 mice treated with convalescent plasma and then infected with SARS-CoV-2 infection did not succumb to the infection but, like many infected patients with mild disease, had loss of smell as a major symptom.

Further investigation of the cells in the nasal passage suggested that the anosmia results from initial infection and damage to a type of cell that helps to support the function of neighboring sensory neurons that detect smell.

“The loss of sense of smell or taste occurs in a large proportion of patients who have COVID-19, whether they’re really sick or if that’s the only sign of illness they have. Most people recover their sense of smell pretty quickly, but some don’t,” says Perlman, UI professor of pediatrics, and of microbiology and immunology, and the Mark Stinski Chair in Virology. “This mouse model opens up the possibility of learning more about how that happens, and if we could understand the mechanisms of why people lose their sense of smell, this will help us treat people.”

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Repurposed mouse model sheds light on loss of smell in COVID-19

Repurposed mouse model sheds light on loss of smell in COVID-19
Stanley Perlman, MD, PhD, professor of pediatrics, and of microbiology and immunology, and Paul McCray, MD, professor of pediatrics, and of microbiology and immunology, stand in a lab at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. Perlman and McCray report that a mouse model previously created to study SARS can develop symptoms of both severe COVID-19 (lung damage, blood clots, abnormal blood vessels, and death) and also of milder disease, including loss of the sense of smell. Credit: Susan McClellen, University of Iowa Health Care Marketing and Communications

A repurposed mouse model can develop symptoms of both severe COVID-19 (lung damage, blood clots, abnormal blood vessels, and death) and also of milder disease, including loss of the sense of smell, according to a recent University of Iowa study published in Nature.

The study also showed that convalescent plasma from a patient who had recovered from COVID-19 protected the mice against lethal disease. The findings suggest the K18-hACE2 mouse model is useful for understanding a spectrum of COVID-19 disease symptoms, and for developing and testing new treatments.

When COVID-19 started spreading across the world earlier this year, UI researchers Stanley Perlman, MD, Ph.D., and Paul McCray, MD, realized that a mouse model they had created a decade earlier to study SARS might be an invaluable tool for understanding the concerning new disease and for testing potential treatments.

In the new study, Perlman, McCray, and colleagues present a detailed characterization of the effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection in these K18-hACE2 mice, which are now readily available from Jackson Laboratories.

Infection with a high dose of the virus produced many of the signs of illness seen in people with severe COVID-19, including severe lung damage, abnormalities in blood vessels known as vasculitis, blood clots, and death.

“The mouse develops pretty robust lung disease that is on the severe end of the spectrum. That gives us an opportunity to investigate what’s going on with lung disease with COVID,” says McCray, UI professor of pediatrics-pulmonology, and of microbiology and immunology, and the Roy J. Carver Chair in Pulmonary Research. “Also, people who die from this disease often have vasculitis, which is unusual for coronavirus infections, and we found that the mice may develop signs of vasculitis in the liver, lung, and brain.”

One particularly interesting finding was that the infected mice lost their sense of smell. This effect, also known as anosmia, is seen in a large proportion of people who get COVID-19, but is not well understood.

The study showed that K18-hACE2 mice treated with convalescent plasma and then infected with SARS-CoV-2 infection did not succumb to the infection but, like many infected patients with mild disease, had loss of smell as a major symptom.

Further investigation of the cells in the nasal passage suggested that the anosmia results from initial infection and damage to a type of cell that helps to support the function of neighboring sensory neurons that detect smell.

“The loss of sense of smell or

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Transgenic mouse model could recapitulate severe COVID-19 in humans

Researchers in the United States and Canada have described the potential for a transgenic mouse model to serve as an effective platform for the study of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and severe disease course in humans.

Study: SARS-CoV-2 infection of human ACE2-transgenic mice causes severe lung inflammation and impaired function. Image Credit: NIAID

As recently reported in the journal Nature Immunology, the model shares many features of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in people and could be useful for evaluating immunomodulatory and antiviral-based drugs.

“Although animal models have been evaluated for SARS-CoV-2 infection, none have fully recapitulated the lung disease phenotypes seen in humans who have been hospitalized,” says the team from Washington University School of Medicine and SCIREQ Scientific Respiratory Equipment in Montreal.

Now, the researchers have shown that the onset of severe clinical disease occurred in the transgenic mice just days after viral infection peaked and was associated with high levels of infiltrating immune cells and inflammatory mediators in the lung.

“This course is remarkably consistent with human disease in which rapid early viral replication is followed by inflammatory responses, which are believed to contribute to pathology, morbidity and mortality,” writes Emma Winkler (Washington University School of Medicine) and colleagues.

SARS-CoV-2 disease course is highly variable

The clinical manifestations of SARS-CoV-2 infection are highly variable, ranging from mild or even no symptoms to severe outcomes, including multi-organ failure and death.

To infect host cells, the virus uses a surface structure called the spike protein to bind and fuse with the human receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2).

This binding of hACE2 primarily directs the virus towards pneumocytes within the lung, where it can cause injury, inflammation and fatal respiratory distress.

“The development of countermeasures that reduce COVID-19 morbidity and mortality is a priority for the global research community, and animal models are essential for this effort,” said Winkler and colleagues.

However, no animal models have yet been developed that recapture the severe disease that occurs in humans.

Hamsters, ferrets and even non-human primates, for example, only develop mild-to-moderate disease and conventional mouse models do not support SARS-CoV-2 binding.

“Thus, additional animal models are needed to enable understanding of the biology of severe SARS-CoV-2 infection in the lung and evaluation of the efficacy of antiviral and immunomodulatory countermeasures,” write the researchers.

The K18-hACE2-transgenic mice model

One platform that has been shown to cause lethal SARS infection in animals is the K18-hACE2-transgenic mouse model, where successful hACE2 expression is driven by the epithelial cell cytokeratin-18 (K18) promoter.

The model was initially developed to study the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-1 following the 2002 to 2003 SARS outbreak.

Now, Winkler and the team have evaluated hACE2-transgenic mice as a potential model of SARS-CoV-2 infection and subsequent severe COVID-19 disease.

What did the study find?

Following intranasal SARS-CoV-2 inoculation, the mice started to lose weight just 4 days post-infection and had succumbed to severe disease by day 7.

High levels of viral RNA and infectious virus were detected in the lungs as early as 2, 4 and 7 days

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