Women’s national team, U.S. Soccer settle part of their lawsuit

U.S. women’s national team players and the U.S. Soccer Federation settled their long-running lawsuit over inequitable working conditions compared with the men’s team while leaving their dispute over unequal pay for additional litigation.

The parties filed a redacted public notice of the settlement with the federal court in Los Angeles on Tuesday while providing the complete agreement to U.S. District Judge R. Gary Klausner. The deal with the world champion American women and the sport’s U.S. governing body calls for charter flights, hotel accommodations, venue selection and professional staff support equitable to that of the men’s national team.

“I hope that the women and their lawyers see that we are taking a new approach,” said Cindy Parlow Cone, a former player who became the first female USSF president in March.

“We want the women’s team as well as their lawyers to see that we want to move in a different direction,” Parlow Cone said. “We want to have a different relationship with them. We want to work together. And I think they’re starting to see that. And we have to continue down this path.”

Players sued the USSF in March 2019 claiming they have not been paid equitably under their collective bargaining agreement that runs through December 2021, compared to what the men’s team receives under its agreement that expired in December 2018. The women asked for more than $66 million in damages under the Equal Pay Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Klausner dismissed the pay claim in May, ruling the women rejected a pay-to-play structure similar to the one in the men’s agreement and accepted greater base salaries and benefits than the men, who failed to qualify for the 2018 World Cup.

But Klausner allowed aspects of their allegations of discriminatory working conditions to be put to trial, which had been scheduled for next month. With those issues settled, the players may now ask the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to restore the wage claims.

“We are pleased that the USWNT players have fought for — and achieved — long overdue equal working conditions,” players’ spokeswoman Molly Levinson said. “We now intend to file our appeal to the court’s decision, which does not account for the central fact in this case that women players have been paid at lesser rates than men who do the same job.

“We remain as committed as ever to our work to achieve the equal pay that we legally deserve. Our focus is on the future and ensuring we leave the game a better place for the next generation of women who will play for this team and this country.”

The lawsuit got international attention. Following the U.S. victory in last year’s World Cup final in Lyon, France, the crowd chanted “Equal Pay!” as players celebrated on the field.

In May, then-presidential candidate Joe Biden posted to Twitter: “To @USWNT: don’t give up this fight. This is not over yet. To @ussoccer: equal pay, now. Or else

Read more

Women’s team, US Soccer settle part of their lawsuit | Sports

The USSF agreed to provide equal resources to both the men’s and women’s teams for chartered flights. The federation also will maintain comparable budgets for accommodations and ensure the women stay in top-quality hotels. Will Wilson, who started as USSF CEO in March, said working conditions of the women will be equal to those of the next labor contract with the men.

USSF will ensure that playing surfaces and venues for women’s matches under its control will be similar to those of the men, an issue that arose when the women refused to play a 2015 exhibition against Trinidad and Tobago on artificial turf in Honolulu. FIFA scheduled the 2015 Women’s World Cup in Canada on artificial turf but the men’s World Cup has been played exclusively on grass.

The federation will provide equal support staffs to both the men’s and women’s teams.

“Coming to agreement on the working conditions was just the first step,” Parlow Cone said. “The goal for both sides in this was to really define a more structured way to provide both teams, the men and the women, with equitable support, also allowing for flexibility at the same time.”

The federation has argued that it cannot pay the women World Cup bonuses matching those of the men because of vastly dissimilar bonus payments for men’s and women’s tournaments paid to federations by FIFA, soccer’s world governing body.

Source Article

Read more

US Soccer reaches deal with women’s national team in fight for equal working conditions, but not equal pay

The United States Soccer Federation and the US Women’s National Team have reached an agreement — but not about equal pay.



Carli Lloyd et al. playing football on a field: FRISCO, TX - MARCH 11: USA midfielder Megan Rapinoe (#15) celebrates with her teammates after scoring a goal during the SheBelieves Cup soccer game between the USA and Japan on March 11, 2020, at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, TX. (Photo by Matthew Visinsky/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)


© Matthew Visinsky/Icon Sportswire/Getty Images
FRISCO, TX – MARCH 11: USA midfielder Megan Rapinoe (#15) celebrates with her teammates after scoring a goal during the SheBelieves Cup soccer game between the USA and Japan on March 11, 2020, at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, TX. (Photo by Matthew Visinsky/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

The two sides have reached a deal resolving the unequal working conditions claim that the USWNT put forth as part of a larger lawsuit from March 2019, which claims the women were paid less than the men’s team and were also subjected to unequal conditions.

The latter claim, US Soccer announced Tuesday, has been resolved, with both parties having filed a proposed settlement. In it, the federation pledges to implement policies specifically related to “hotel accommodations, staffing, venues, and travel.”

In a statement, Molly Levinson, a spokeswoman for the USWNT players, emphasized the deal does not indicate the end of the legal battle, saying the team still plans to appeal the court’s decision this past May dismissing the team’s equal pay claims.

The deal, Levinson said, doesn’t “account for the central fact in this case that women players have been paid at lesser rates than men who do the same job.”

“We remain as committed as ever to our work to achieve the equal pay that we legally deserve,” she said. “Our focus is on the future and ensuring we leave the game a better place for the next generation of women who will play for this team and this country.”

Cindy Parlow Cone, US Soccer president and a former USWNT player, called Tuesday’s deal a “positive step forward,” and she urged the team to accept the standing offer to discuss contract options.

“As a former USWNT player, I can promise you that I am committed to equality between the USWNT and USMNT,” she said in a statement, referring to the men’s national team. “My goal is, and has always been, to come to a resolution on all equal pay matters and inspire a new era of collaboration, partnership and trust between the USWNT and the Federation.”

US Soccer president: Equal pay demands would ‘bankrupt’ the organization

In a conference call following the announcement, Cone told reporters that the federation has reached out to the team and offered them the same contract as the men for games controlled by US Soccer. However, Cone said, the team is requesting the federation make up the FIFA World Cup prize money, a “vast majority of the $66 million they’re requesting in back pay.”

Making up that money, Cone said, would likely bankrupt US Soccer.

“This would be devastating to our budget and to our programming,” she said. “But given Covid, not to be overly dramatic, but it would likely bankrupt the federation.”

In May, USWNT star Megan Rapinoe, appearing on ABC’s “Good Morning America” after the court dismissed the team’s

Read more

U.S. Women’s Soccer Team Settles Part Of Gender Discrimination Suit : NPR

Megan Rapinoe (center) and Alex Morgan (right), pictured celebrating with U.S. women’s soccer teammates in New York after a ticker tape parade, on July 10, 2019. “We are pleased that the USWNT Players have fought for – and achieved – long overdue equal working conditions,” a spokeswoman for the team said on Tuesday.

Seth Wenig/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Seth Wenig/AP

Megan Rapinoe (center) and Alex Morgan (right), pictured celebrating with U.S. women’s soccer teammates in New York after a ticker tape parade, on July 10, 2019. “We are pleased that the USWNT Players have fought for – and achieved – long overdue equal working conditions,” a spokeswoman for the team said on Tuesday.

Seth Wenig/AP

The U.S. Soccer Federation has reached a proposed settlement with the Women’s National Team in a legal battle over working conditions but a dispute over equal pay with that of their male counterparts continues.

The agreement, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California on Tuesday, is a partial victory for the World Cup champion U.S. women’s soccer team, who will see an improvement in hotel accommodations, venues, travel and staffing that will put them on equal footing with players on the Men’s National Team.

“This is a good day. I hope everyone sees that we are a new U.S. Soccer,” U.S. Soccer President Cindy Parlow Cone told reporters in a press conference.

She noted a slew of internal personnel changes, including herself and new CEO Will Wilson, saying their “fresh approach” is helping to rebuild the strained relationship between the players and the federation.

Among the most notable changes under the proposed settlement is a requirement that “matches be played on grass in almost all circumstances.” The women’s team has been fighting for years to put an end to matches played on artificial surfaces — a condition with which the men’s team rarely contends.

The federation will also provide an equal number of chartered flights to the women’s and men’s teams, and it has agreed to offer comparable hotel accommodations for the teams. They will also have comparable staff, with 18 to 21 professional positions to provide support services to the respective teams.

“Coming to an agreement on the working conditions is just the first step,” Parlow Cone added in a reference to ongoing compensation-related litigation.

Molly Levinson, a spokesperson for the players was also pleased with the outcome of negotiations on Tuesday, although she confirmed that the WNT’s legal challenge over wages is far from over.

“We are pleased that the USWNT Players have fought for – and achieved – long overdue equal working conditions,” Levinson said in a statement.

“We now intend to file our appeal to the Court’s decision which does not account for the central fact in this case that women players have been paid at lesser rates than men who do the same job. We remain as committed as ever to our work to achieve the equal pay that we legally deserve. Our focus

Read more

Women’s team, U.S. Soccer settle part of their working condition lawsuit

The USWNT observe a moment of silence prior to the United States international friendly match against Ireland at the Rose Bowl on August 3, 2019 in Pasadena, California. The United States won the match 3-0.

Shaun Clark/Getty Images

U.S. women’s national team players and the U.S. Soccer Federation have settled their long-running lawsuit over inequitable working conditions with the men’s team while leaving their dispute over unequal pay for additional litigation.

The parties filed a redacted public notice of the settlement with the federal court in Los Angeles on Tuesday while providing the complete agreement to U.S. District Judge R. Gary Klausner. The deal with the world champion American women and the sport’s U.S. governing body calls for charter flights, hotel accommodations, venue selection and professional staff support equitable to that of the men’s national team.

Players sued the USSF in March 2019 claiming they have not been paid equitably under their collective bargaining agreement compared to what is received by the men’s team, which failed to qualify for the 2018 World Cup. The women asked for more than $66 million in damages under the Equal Pay Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Klausner dismissed the pay claim in May, ruling the women rejected a pay-to-play structure like the men’s agreement and accepted greater base salaries and benefits.

But Klausner allowed aspects of their allegations of discriminatory working conditions to be put to trial. Those issues were settled, and players may now ask the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to restore the wage claims.

“We are pleased that the USWNT players have fought for — and achieved — long-overdue equal working conditions,” players’ spokeswoman Molly Levinson said. “We now intend to file our appeal to the court’s decision, which does not account for the central fact in this case that women players have been paid at lesser rates than men who do the same job.

“We remain as committed as ever to our work to achieve the equal pay that we legally deserve. Our focus is on the future and ensuring we leave the game a better place for the next generation of women who will play for this team and this country.”

Following the U.S. victory in last year’s World Cup final in Lyon, France, the crowd chanted “Equal Pay!” as players celebrated on the field.

Then-presidential candidate Joe Biden posted to Twitter: “To @USWNT: don’t give up this fight. This is not over yet. To @ussoccer: equal pay, now. Or else when I’m president, you can go elsewhere for World Cup funding,” referring to the 2026 men’s World Cup, set to be co-hosted by the United States, Mexico and Canada.

After the USSF argued in court documents that women lacked the skills and responsibilities of their male counterparts, sponsors criticized the federation. Federation President Carlos Cordeiro resigned in March and was replaced by former national team player Cindy Parlow Cone.

“We hope today’s positive step forward will result in the USWNT accepting

Read more

USWNT, U.S. Soccer agree to settlement on working conditions

No details were announced. A judge still must approve the proposal. The deal was reached about a month before the issue was set to go to trial.

“We are pleased that the players have fought for — and achieved — long-overdue equal working conditions,” said Molly Levinson, spokeswoman for the players.

USSF President Cindy Parlow Cone, a former star player, called the settlement “just a first step. The goal for both sides in this was really to define a more structured way to provide both teams — the men and the women — with equitable support while still allowing for flexibility.”

The settlement is unrelated to claims by the women’s team of wage discrimination, which were dismissed in May. The players have said they planned to appeal that decision after the issue of working conditions was resolved. An appeal probably would not be heard for several months.

With Tuesday’s agreement, Levinson said, “we now intend to file our appeal to the court’s decision, which does not account for the central fact in this case that women players have been paid at lesser rates than men who do the same job. …

“We remain as committed as ever to our work to achieve the equal pay that we legally deserve. Our focus is on the future and ensuring we leave the game a better place for the next generation of women who will play for this team and this country.”

After years of acrimony between the players and past USSF leadership, “I hope the women and their lawyers see we are taking a new approach,” said Cone, who in March became USSF president after Carlos Cordeiro resigned amid criticism of the federation’s handling of the case.

In May, a judge in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California granted summary judgment in favor of the federation, dealing a severe blow to the players’ efforts to recoup what they claimed was about $67 million in back pay.

The dispute is complicated because the U.S. men’s and women’s teams have different compensation systems. The men are paid for individual appearances and performances, while the women opted for a pay structure that includes more security in the form of negotiated annual salaries, child-care benefits and severance.

The women’s collective bargaining agreement is due to expire in early 2022. Cone said the federation has offered the women’s team a contract similar to the men’s.

“Unfortunately,” she said, “they didn’t want to negotiate” unless the back-pay issue was resolved first. Most of the players’ claims are tied to prize money for winning the World Cup, which they accomplished in 2015 and 2019. However, prize money is controlled by FIFA, soccer’s global governing body.

In 2018, FIFA awarded $38 million to France for winning the men’s tournament. A year later, the U.S. women received $4 million. Since then, FIFA President Gianni Infantino has suggested doubling the overall prize money for the women’s tournament and the organization’s investment in women’s soccer globally.

However, Cone said,

Read more

Women’s team, US Soccer settle part of their lawsuit

U.S. Soccer and the women’s national team have settled the players’ legal claim over inequitable working conditions, putting to rest a part of the team’s gender discrimination lawsuit

U.S. women’s national team players and the U.S. Soccer Federation have settled their long-running lawsuit over inequitable working conditions with the men’s team while leaving their dispute over unequal pay for additional litigation.

The parties filed a redacted public notice of the settlement with the federal court in Los Angeles on Tuesday while providing the complete agreement to U.S. District Judge R. Gary Klausner. The deal with the world champion American women and the sport’s U.S. governing body calls for charter flights, hotel accommodations, venue selection and professional staff support equitable to that of the men’s national team.

Klausner dismissed the pay claim in May, ruling the women rejected a pay-to-play structure like the men’s agreement and accepted greater base salaries and benefits.

But Klausner allowed aspects of their allegations of discriminatory working conditions to be put to trial. Those issue were settled, and players may now ask the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to restore the wage claims.

“We are pleased that the USWNT players have fought for — and achieved — long overdue equal working conditions,” players’ spokeswoman Molly Levinson said. “We now intend to file our appeal to the court’s decision, which does not account for the central fact in this case that women players have been paid at lesser rates than men who do the same job.

“We remain as committed as ever to our work to achieve the equal pay that we legally deserve. Our focus is on the future and ensuring we leave the game a better place for the next generation of women who will play for this team and this country.”

Then-presidential candidate Joe Biden posted to Twitter: “To @USWNT: don’t give up this fight. This is not over yet. To @ussoccer: equal pay, now. Or else when I’m president, you can go elsewhere for World Cup funding,” referring to the 2026 men’s World Cup, set to be co-hosted by the United States, Mexico and Canada.

After the USSF argued in court documents that women lacked the skills and responsibilities of their male counterparts, sponsors criticized the federation. Federation President Carlos Cordeiro resigned in March and was replaced by

Read more

2020-21 UEFA Champions League: European soccer model reveals best bets for Wednesday, Dec. 2

The 2020-21 UEFA Champions League group stage continues on Wednesday with eight intriguing matchups, including Sevilla vs. Chelsea and Manchester United vs. PSG. All eight fixtures can be streamed on CBS All-Access. Before you lock in your UEFA Champions League picks for Wednesday, you NEED to see what our proprietary European soccer model has to say.

Created by two Norwegians — professional poker player and sports bettor Jonas Gjelstad, and economics and engineering expert Marius Norheim — the model analyzes worldwide betting data and exploits market inefficiencies, helping its followers cash in. Since coming to SportsLine last year, the algorithm is up almost $9,000!

The model also made some strong calls in the Champions League group stage last week, correctly predicting Lazio (-118) defeating Zenit, Chelsea (-130) knocking off Rennes and Barcelona (-250) topping Dynamo Kiev.

Now, the model has set its sights on Wednesday’s Champions League fixtures and revealed its picks for every match. We can tell you the model is leaning Over 2.5 goals in Krasnodar vs. Rennes.

The model also has money-line picks for Brugge vs. Zenit, Juventus vs. Dynamo Kiev and every other UEFA Champions League match. You ABSOLUTELY need to see them before you lock in your own picks!

So who is the model backing on Wednesday? And where does all the betting value lie? … Join SportsLine now to see the model’s UEFA Champions League picks, and see where all the betting value lies, all from the proprietary European soccer model that’s up almost $9,000!

Source Article

Read more

USWNT and US Soccer Settle Workplace Claims

The United States Soccer Federation and its World Cup champion women’s team said Tuesday that they had resolved the players’ outstanding claims about working conditions, a rare moment of détente — and mutual happiness — in the sides’ long-running legal fight about equal pay.

The agreement, filed in federal court in California, is equal parts labor peace and legal maneuvering. By removing one of the last unresolved items in the team’s wage-discrimination lawsuit, U.S. Soccer and its new leadership team rid themselves of one more point of contention in a dispute they would prefer to see end.

For the players and their lawyers, the deal brings opportunity: In dispensing with their claims about unequal working conditions, the women’s stars cleared the way to appeal a ruling in May that had rejected most of their equal pay claims.

U.S. Soccer’s president, Cindy Parlow Cone, hailed the agreement, saying it signaled the federation’s efforts “to find a new way forward” with the women’s team and, hopefully, a way out of the rest of the litigation.

“This settlement is good news for everyone,” Cone said, “and I believe will serve as a springboard for continued progress.”

The agreement on working conditions codified an effort that U.S. Soccer had already begun to remove any differences in areas like staffing, travel, hotel accommodations and related issues when men’s and women’s national team players are in camp. U.S. Soccer said it would put the agreement into effect immediately.

The deal does not address past working conditions or involve any payments to the women’s players, according to a U.S. Soccer official familiar with the agreement. But in resolving the players’ claims of workplace discrimination, it will allow the players to refocus on overturning the ruling on their equal pay claims. That effort, if successful, could be worth tens of millions of dollars in back pay and damages.

“We are pleased that the USWNT players have fought for — and achieved — long overdue equal working conditions,” Molly Levinson, a spokeswoman for the players, said in a statement. “We now intend to file our appeal to the court’s decision, which does not account for the central fact in this case that women players have been paid at lesser rates than men who do the same job.

“We remain as committed as ever,” Levinson added, “to our work to achieve the equal pay that we legally deserve.”

The women’s players and U.S. Soccer have been plotting a path forward in their relationship since May, when a federal judge, R. Gary Klausner of United States District Court for the Central District of California, delivered a crushing blow to the players’ equal pay arguments.

In his ruling, Judge Klausner not only dismissed the players’ contention that they were systematically underpaid by U.S. Soccer in comparison with men’s national team players, but he also said the federation had substantiated its argument that the women’s team had actually earned more “on both a cumulative and an average per-game basis” than the men’s team

Read more

Vanderbilt women’s soccer player receives SEC football honor | Sports

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Southeastern Conference has named Vanderbilt kicker Sarah Fuller as the league’s co-special teams player of the week after she made history becoming the first woman to play in a Power 5 conference football game.

Fuller shared the award Monday with Florida punt returner Kadarius Toney after the senior soccer player served as Vanderbilt’s primary kicker in a loss to Missouri. She sent a squib kick 30 yards that was covered at the Missouri 35 to open the second half in her only chance to kick.

The Vanderbilt kicker became the third woman to play at the Football Bowl Subdivision level, joining Katie Hnida who was the first scoring two extra points for New Mexico on Aug. 30, 2003 and April Goss who had an extra point for Kent State in 2015.

Fuller is continuing to practice with Vanderbilt, which visits No. 11 Georgia on Saturday. Fuller helped Vanderbilt win the Southeastern Conference women’s tournament title on Nov. 22.

More AP college football: https://apnews.com/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP—Top25

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Source Article

Read more
  • Partner links